Mike McCoy

SVU

“In the criminal justice system, moving sports team based offenses are considered especially heinous.  In the city of San Diego, the dedicated fans who witness these vicious felonies are in an elite squad known as the Save Our Bolts Unit. These are their stories.  BUM BUM!” – Parody of Law and Order Special Victims Unit

 

The date, January 12th 2017, will be forever known as the day the Chargers died in San Diego. Included in the passing, 56 year of hopes and dreams of many San Diego Chargers fans have been buried. Dreams of seeing this team finally win a Super Bowl, which would included a parade throughout America’s finest city, have now perished.  With that murdered dream, so goes the possibility of many San Diegans to finally say “Yes we finally have a winner!”

 

This is not a game of Clue, or an episode of S.V.U that leaves us pondering who the murderer is. The murderer of those said hopes and dreams of many San Diego citizens and Charger fans worldwide, is Dean Spanos.  Instead of being the bigger man and really fighting for a stadium, in which the Chargers have been looking at for the past 15 years, Dean chose the easy way out. He walked away from fighting against a market whom is claiming “LA doesn’t want the Chargers,” a failed Proposition C in which he seemed to turn into a ghost, and debating against hoteliers regarding a huge tax hike.

 

Even with the attendance down, Dean was making more than enough money to keep this team afloat in San Diego. This move, simply put, is about having more money. This is about greed beating out the loyalty of a fan base that had supported this team through tough seasons when in reality, there were way better things to do in America’s finest city.

 

The loss of Prop C was just a cop out of Dean and his goons to make a few extra million dollars. What does Dean gain? The so called 25% of fan base that’s supposedly in LA? Does Dean not know percentages? He had 75% of a fan base in San Diego or from San Diego, yet he chose the smaller amount. The ironically humorous part of that is those 25% should probably fill the 27,000 seat stadium the Bolts will play in for the next two years.

 

Funny to think that if he just showed some commitment to put a winner on the field for the past few years, the city would’ve rewarded Dean with a reasonable offer that worked for everyone. Instead, San Diegans are left without a team that they supported from Sid Gillman all the way to Mike McCoy. This fan base never wavered, staying ignorantly loyal up to the very end.

 

How fitting though; the team that has made it an art form of crushing our hopes for the past 56 years, breaks our hearts for one last time.

 

As far as I am concerned, I will not follow that goon of an owner to the city most Charger fans have been raised to root against. Dean showed us no respect leaving San Diego and making a crappy LA logo in the same day. Why show him and his team that same respect?

 

I will keep my jerseys and my memories of which I have so many to share; perhaps unveiling them in another article. As far as the other city that Chargers team now calls home, I wish the players the best of luck, especially my favorite player Antonio Gates. I can not consciously follow this team to Los Angeles and in reading through numerous social media outlets, it appears many will not as well.

 

For those staying out of LA and ditching Dean and his organization, like he has ditched us, let’s hear the SAN DIEGO CHARGERS ANTHEM one last time and reflect on our time spent as loyal SAN DIEGO CHARGER fans.

 

 

Chris Hoke

lynn2

 

Hot on the heels of the monumental Thursday morning announcement of the team formerly known as the San Diego Chargers moving up the I-5 to Los Angeles, a new head coach was announced to spearhead the new Los Angeles Chargers.

On Friday, the now Los Angeles Chargers officially announced former Buffalo Bills’ interim head coach Anthony Lynn as their successor to Mike McCoy. Lynn was a running back in the NFL for six seasons from 1993-1999. He was initially signed as an undrafted free agent running back by the Denver Broncos. He played a season in San Francisco (1995-’96) before finishing his career in Denver from 1997 to 1999.  Lynn has two Super Bowl rings as part of the John Elway-led team that won back-to-back titles in 1997 and 1998.

Since retiring from playing the game in 2000, Lynn has worked his way up the coaching ranks. After two seasons in Denver as a special teams coach, he was brought in as a running backs coach for Jacksonville, Dallas, Cleveland and New York Jets before landing in Buffalo in 2015. Lynn served as running backs coach until week three of the 2016 season. Bills OC Greg Roman was fired after week two and Lynn was promoted to offensive coordinator. He was the week 17 interim head coach after Rex Ryan was fired in week 16.

Lynn is a low-profile, safe choice for the Chargers. Not much will be expected of him or the team given their recent history.  The Chargers have finished in the cellar the last two seasons, only winning a combined nine games. They made the playoffs once in the four years of the Mike McCoy era.

Despite the fact he has no head coaching experience at any level of football, he is expected to keep Ken Whisenhunt as offensive coordinator and various media outlets are reporting he wants to hire former Jacksonville Jaguars head coach Gus Bradley to replace John Pagano as defensive coordinator. If the Bradley hire happens, that places two experienced head coaches to accelerate his learning curve.

Lynn becomes the first minority head coach in the history of the Chargers franchise. He is widely respected around the league as a running game mastermind. From 2009-13 his Jets led the league in rushing. Each season in Buffalo, the Bills have led the NFL in rushing. If he can do that with a past his prime veteran like LeSean McCoy, imagine what he will be able to do with a young, budding superstar like Melvin Gordon.

Lynn inherits a roster with many budding stars yet to hit their prime and if they can stay healthy, could make the playoffs as soon as next season. So far, the Chargers have led the league in players sent to injured reserve over the past few seasons. Staying healthy and offensive line stability has been their biggest downfall.

All things considered, there is no place to go but up for Lynn and the Chargers. The stadium drama is over and players now know in which city their future lies. That has to be good for something. Now everyone can focus on getting healthy and just playing football, which may be exactly what this team needs.

What do you think? Good signing? Bad signing? Too soon to care? Leave your thoughts in the comments below.

 

#StillBoltedUp

 

The Greg One

 

Follow me on Twitter @LordOfTheGregs

 

 

 

Image result for bobby ross chargers

It is no secret that the San Diego Chargers are on the hunt for a new head coach. Yes, Mike McCoy has worn out his welcome and has been shown the door. As Chargers coaches go, he wasn’t anywhere near the worst. Nor was he near the best. Some give him the excuse that injuries handcuffed McCoy and made it impossible to win. There is an element of truth to that statement, but the fact that he still showed poor game management and lacked any kind of personality didn’t help his argument for staying on and at least finishing his contract. No, McCoy had to go and a new coach must be ushered in. In fact, I would be so bold as to say that this hire may be the most important decision that the Bolts have moving forward. More important then who they re-sign, who they draft, and as far as wins and losses go, where they play.

Judging by the list of candidates that the Chargers have lined up, it appears that the upper management may want a defensive minded coach. In fact, the first three candidates interviewed were all current defensive coordinators. History shows that building a team with the attitude of a defensive mind has worked well for the Chargers. I know what you are thinking, if you are old enough to remember, “The Chargers earned their stripes as an offensive juggernaut!” Well that is true, but that style has not worked in decades. The last two coaches who truly built a formidable contender were both defensive minded; Bobby Ross and Marty Schottenheimer.

Taking a look at all 15 former head coaches of the San Diego Chargers, you will see that only six have a winning record. Here is the list of former coaches, when they coached, their record and winning percentages:

Sid Gilman                                    ’60-’69 & ’71            87-57-6         .600

Charlie Waller                              ’69-’70                       9-7-3              .553

Harland Svare                              ’71-73                         7-17-2            .307

Ron Waller                                    ’73                              1-5                  .166

Tommy Prothro                           ’74-78                        21-39             .350

Don Coryell                                  ’78-’86                      72-60             .545

Al Saunders                                  ’86-’88                      17-22             .436

Dan Henning                                ’89-’91                       16-32             .333

Bobby Ross                                   ’92-’96                       50-36            .581

Kevin Gilbride                              ’97-’98                       6-16                .272

June Jones                                     ’98                              3-7                  .300

Mike Riley                                      ’99-01                        14-34             .292

Marty Schottenheimer              ’02-’06                      47-33             .588

Norv Turner                                  ’07-’12                       59-43             .578

Mike McCoy                                   ’13-’17                        28-38            .424

As you  can clearly see, it has been a long time since an offensive mindset has been successful for the Chargers. Sid Gilman was the only coach to ever lead the Chargers to a championship and he was most definitely an offensive coach. But Gilman was doing things offensively with the passing game that had never been done before. Defenses had not had time to adjust to his aerial circus.

Sure, Norv Turner had the fourth best winning percentage of any Chargers coach in history, but it is widely understood that he inherited a great roster from Schottenheimer and systematically burned it to the ground in just a few years.

Yes, Don Coryell is a legend and had one of the best offenses in NFL history! But, the lack of importance placed on the defense in those years doomed his teams to falling short of their ultimate goal. Now, the same thing could be said about Schottenheimer and the post-season. He did indeed fail in the post-season as well, even with his defensive mindset. That is true, but let’s not forget that Marty was fired with a 14-2 record and a roster that could still be dominant for years to come. He was not given the chance to run the full course. We will never know what could have been.

As previously stated, it does appear to be time for a new sheriff in town. Not just a new face saying the same old garbage. The Chargers need a new face, with a new attitude. An attitude of accountability and determination. An attitude of winning is what matters, not excuses. If they fail to find the right man for the job, look for beloved players like Philip Rivers and Antonio Gates to end their potential Hall of Fame careers without any jewelry to show for it. It’s now or never for those great Chargers.

Whether the Chargers go with an offensive or defense coach, or even a special teams guy, there is one thing that they need to do above all else……GET IT RIGHT!

 

 

mccoy11

 

 

… where the Good Lord split ya!

EDITOR’S NOTE: The area in which the Lord split you happens to be the buttock cheeks region, so to speak.

 

The dismissal of Mike McCoy has finally arrived! He didn’t even make it to Black Monday. This move by the Chargers front office is at least a year overdue.

I’ve written many times over the last two years that I didn’t think McCoy had the stuff to be a head coach in the NFL. This year only served to reinforce my opinion.

Putting aside a 28-38 record as a head coach for a minute, his inability to finish games reared its ugly head far too often during his tenure with the Bolts, especially during the last two seasons. Too many times, we saw the Chargers come out of the locker room at halftime with an entirely different attitude. We watched them nurse leads, thinking they could just shorten the game and run the clock out on offense. Defensively, we saw a much more passive defense. This conservative playcalling cost the team countless victories in 2015-16.

Why McCoy felt comfortable sitting on leads is something I just don’t understand. If a coach doesn’t have a killer instinct, how can he expect his players to employ said killer instinct, allowing them to finish games with a victory in the win column. If a lead is built by playing aggressive, full-throttle football, wouldn’t it make sense to continue that attitude for 60 minutes instead of 30 or 45 minutes? McCoy’s lack of killer instinct, much like his predecessor, is just one of my gripes with him. I won’t bother to get into his many crimes against the game clock or his pathetic, useless rhetoric during post-game press conferences.

I’m glad there will be no more post-game pressers filled with clichés, with McCoy saying a bunch of nothing words. The phrases “next man up” and “we need to finish” make me want to projectile vomit all over everything I enjoy in life. He thinks he’s “the hoodie,” but he’s lacking something a little bit important: Belichick’s credentials.

When you’re Mike McCoy, talking to a soft media which is accustomed to mediocrity and ready to cut you slack, try being a little forthcoming.

My apologies go out to members of the media who may read this. I think you know what I mean. How long did we put up with Norv Turner? How long did we put up with Bud Black? How long did media members make excuses for both?

Now, I digress.

I can only hope that Dean Spanos breaks a perceived habit and decides to spend for a quality head coach.

Additionally, before anyone puts words in my mouth, I don’t mean Chuckie, Cowher or Coughlin.

Not happening.

Ever.

 

Thanks for reading.  Let me know your thoughts!

 

Mike Pisciotta

#mwlm

 

Image result for Bill Cowher

So, I’ve been reading lots of comments about how we should hire either Jon Gruden or Bill Cowher. Let’s take a look at both candidates and a few other names that have been mentioned by Chargers fans.

 

Jon Gruden: Personally, I don’t get it. I don’t see Gruden as a great coach who can walk in and save the day. After two minutes of research, I found that Jon Gruden has a career coaching record of 95-81 (.540). He coached for 11 years. He had a record of 5-4 in the playoffs with one Super Bowl win. His best single season record was 12-4 and his worst was 4-12.

 
Gruden’s record shows that he is an adequate coach who can win with the right players. I believe his reputation as a tough guy (Chucky) and his recognizable name are the two reasons he is considered a “sexy” pick.

 
Bill Cowher: A much better choice, in my humble opinion. He has a career record of 149-90-1 (.623). He coached for 15 years. He was 12-9 in the post-season with two trips to the Super Bowl with one victory and one loss. His best single season record was 15-1 and his worst was 6-10. There are two knocks that go against Cowher. 1. He is too old. 2. He has a cushy job and doesn’t want to leave it.

 

I don’t buy number one. He is 59 years old. That is not old in coach years. He just retired young. Number two, on the other hand, I totally believe. I don’t think he would want to leave his TV gig for the grind of the NFL. Also, if he came back and failed, it would tarnish his legacy.

 

Let’s just move from both of these guys. If Cowher says he wants the job, I’m fine with that. But I don’t think he will. If Gruden wants the job, I would not be excited.

 
For comparison’s sake, Bill Belichick’s winning percentage is .670 and Norv Turner’s winning percentage with San Diego was .583 with a career percentage of .483.

Other names being talked about by Chargers fans on social media:

Rex Ryan: Coached for eight years so far. Record of 60-65 (.480). Playoff record of 4-2 with no Super Bowl appearances. Best record 11-5, worst 4-12

David Shaw: No NFL head coaching experience. .788 winning percentage while at Stanford.

Ken Whisenhunt: Head coach for eight years. Overall record of 48-71 (.403). Post-season record 4-2 with one trip to the Super Bowl (loss). Best record 10-6. Worst 2-14.

Sean Payton: Head coach for 10 years. Career record of 92-65 (.586). Post-season record 6-4 with one Super Bowl victory. Best record 13-3 (twice). Worst 7-9.

Mike McCoy: Head coach for four years. Career record of 27-34 (.443). Post-season record 1-1 with zero trips to the Super Bowl. Best record 9-7. Worst 4-12.

 

riversfrustrated

 

 

The Chargers looked to move back to .500 in Week 10 as they faced the Dolphins at home before heading into the Bye Week. Unfortunately, huge mistakes in key situations lead to the Miami Dolphins stealing this game away from the Chargers.

Let’s take a look at the good, the bad and the ugly of another heartbreaking Chargers’ loss.

 

The Good

Tyrell Williams– 5 REC, 126 YDS, TD 

With Travis Benjamin out with a knee injury, Tyrell Williams stepped up in a big way, as he has done pretty much all season. You have to love Tyrell’s ability to find ways to get open and his desire to learn from his mistakes. After running the wrong route and getting chewed out by Philip Rivers and Mike McCoy, Williams made up for his error the very next play with a game/momentum changing 51 yard touchdown reception. You almost wonder if Tyrell would have come this far if this team still had Keenan Allen and Stevie Johnson. None the less, look for Tyrell to get even better after the bye week, sans any injury setback.

 

Chargers Defense– No Denzel Perryman or Jatavis Brown?  No problem.  With those key injuries, this rag-tag defensive unit did their job in key moments in the game, especially Korey Toomer who lead the way with ten tackles and one assist.  In addition, this band of misfits was able to hold the NFL’s leading rusher, Jay Ajayi, to 79 yards on 19 carries. Even if I didn’t agree with John Pagano’s play calling at key moments, you can’t blame the defense for this loss. The defense kept the Chargers in it until the end and with the upcoming bye week, this defense should get even better; getting Brown and Perryman back from injury,

Worth a mentionTrevor Williams, Melvin Ingram and Melvin Gordon.

 

The Bad

Joe Barksdale

In four games with nine penalties on one player, there comes a time where you have to rethink who is out there. It would be okay if Joe was good at his job. The truth is he’s not. In those four games he has been consistently beat at the point of attack, allowing Rivers to be sacked on multiple occasions. With the present bye week, the coaching staff needs to see that just because he is healthy, Barksdale is just not getting it done.  Can they please try Chris Hairston or DJ Fluker at the right tackle position?

 

Offensive Line Pass Protection

In addition to Barksdale, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention how bad this line was as whole. For the second week in a row, Rivers continued to find himself looking up at a blue San Diego sky. Three times last Sunday, Rivers was probably wondering if his line would ever protect him. This has been a consistent problem that can only be fixed by a short, quick passing game and running the ball far more consistently.

 

The Ugly

Philip Rivers– 23/44 326 YDs, 3 TDs, 4 INTs 

After the game Rivers took all the blame for the team losing on Sunday as he should have. This team lives and dies by his success and struggles. Rivers struggled a lot on Sunday throwing four interceptions; three of which were in key points of the game. The first one of those three came off of a rare Dolphins turnover, giving the Bolts a 1st and goal at the five yard line. Rivers looked like he just wasn’t paying attention to zone defense as he threw into double coverage for an easy interception.  Tough to come out of that situation with no touchdown – let alone no points at all.

 

The second came as the Chargers were driving down the field late in the game – trying to get in field goal range for a game winning score. Philip was baited into thinking Kiko Alonso was blitzing, As the ball was snapped, Kiko instead backs out into zone stepping in front of the first read. Tyrell Williams. and took it back for the Dolphins go ahead score. Finally, on the game sealing interception, #17 is again looking for Tyrell who wasn’t even open on the play. He forced it, instead of looking elsewhere or taking the sack and live to fight another down.With the upcoming bye week, its time for Rivers to rest up. Get Travis Benjamin back and hoping Williams gets 100% healthy he will try to get this team back into the thick of things if it’s not too late.

 

 

Situational Play Calling- Too many times this season have we seen this team get bogged down in the redzone. Why? Because we run the same predictable plays every time we get to the opponents twenty yard line or closer. Where was the screen passes? Where was the quick slants? We ran a screen to Melvin Gordon on a crucial third down and he was able to gain a ton of yards. Yet we only ran the screen again with a failed screen to Antonio Gates. Lets be realistic for a moment: Screens are for speedy and shifty players in the open field. Gates is none of those at the back-end of his career. Quick slants were one of the factors in the Chargers victory against the Tennessee Titans the previous week. Yet against Miami, the offense went away from the bread and butter.

 

Most of the season, the question most asked is “Why didn’t the charger run the ball (in key situations)?  I’m aware Gordon was getting stuffed for most of the game, however Ayaji was also getting stopped but the Dolphins had no problem running it in twice in the red-zone. So if San Diego fired Frank Reich last year for these same issues, why  does this continue to happen? The answer is Mike McCoy who seems to have some sort of say in these situations. If this is the case, Mike has to go this week. He is holding this team back from being good or great. I for one have seen enough of this McNorv experiment and its time to move on. I hope that during this time off, the “powers that be” make the right decision and let McCoy go. A change is desperately needed, although I highly doubt this organization has any guts to do it.

 

Worth a mentionDwight Lowery

 

 

Chris Hoke

mccoy11

 

 

Watching Mike McCoy’s press conference Monday made me more irritable than watching the Chargers lose another close game against the Miami Dolphins. It was more irritating than watching the anarchy after the presidential election. So for all you protesters of firing McCoy…..

 

You now have my vote.

 

Every question during said press conference, seemed to be answered with the preface, “Like I’ve been telling you from day 1…” Yes Mike, you have said the same thing over and over again since the beginning and look where your team is at?

 

Clearly he does not listen to himself nor reviews his press conferences afterwards. The reason I know he doesn’t?? Nothing seems to change.  

 

I have been giving McCoy a very long leash up until now. I like the man and felt that he was handed a bad product; a product that is always injured and broken – like a Christmas toy that your dad has to become MacGyver in order to get it to work again.  

 

And I still feel this way….to a point. In Sundays loss to Miami, the Dolphins exploited the rookies and sophomores. They knew what we had and punished us for it. Philip Rivers had an awful day, one that I am sure he would agree with. From the onset of the game, there was no continuity between him and his receivers – even with Antonio Gates.

 

The makeshift defense has done as well if not better than expected. With all the injuries in the defensive backfield, the secondary is playing well due to the dominance upfront with the likes of Brandon Mebane, Melvin Ingram, Joey Bosa and Jatavis Brown. Although last week, with not as much quarterback pressure and always worried about the run game, the weak secondary was peppered with blown coverages and missed tackles. Furthermore, their performance, for the most part, in the second half has been nothing shy of depressing. What happens in the locker room at halftime?  Isn’t part of the job of John Pagano and McCoy to inspire and motivate the players to continue their supremacy?

 

Let’s get back to the press conference.

 

One of the head coach’s remarks was about how the mistakes prior to the 4th quarter is just as big and bothersome as the mistakes made in the last 15 minutes of play. Question after question was brought up about the late let down and Mike continued deflecting those questions and making excuses for bad play earlier in the game.

 

Hey Mike? Let’s agree to disagree.

 

Sure there are spots during a game where San Diego has missed opportunities to take a commanding lead, or at least be the cog and shut down any momentum created by the opposition. However, since Mike has been wearing the Charger visor, the team has been awful in close games (8 points or fewer) with or without the lead heading into the final frame. Take a look at these numbers:

 

Since the 2013 season and through last week’s game, the Bolts are 15-23 in games decided by 8 points or less. For you statisticians, that equals a 39.47 winning percentage.  

 

Now of those 38 games, San Diego was leading at the end of the 3rd quarter 15 times (7-8 record) and behind 20 times (6-14 record). I understand those numbers don’t add up for all you following at home. So let me add that three out of those 38 games they were tied (2-1 record) heading into the 4th quarter.

 

Closing out games, in my humble opinion, is just as important as controlling the game in the early onset. In fact I will go out on a limb and say that the last quarter is the most crucial. Every team makes mistakes; blown coverages, missed throws, turnovers…etc. Those are bound to happen.  In fact, the likelihood of any NFL team playing a “perfect” game is as minuscule as the chances of me dating model Ashley Alexxis.

 

The simple fact is that not many times is an NFL team going to be blowing out their opponent every week; hence why it is vital to be able to have that “closer” mentality.

 

Speaking of dominant closers, perhaps Coach McCoy needs to watch San Diego Padres game where Trevor Hoffman comes in and shuts down the opponents. Trevor, one of the best closers in all of baseball, was so dominate and fearless when he came out to “Hells Bells,” that even when he got older, hitters were still in fear of facing him. But that is what a closer is supposed to do. The team battles all game to lead late in the game, and the closer shuts it down.  

 

It would be fantastic if McCoy would stop repeating himself about what he has “…been telling us from day 1.” We know this team has not been able to put the clamps on the opposition in the final quarter. My question, if I were allowed in the press room, would be this:

 

What are you going to do about it Coach?

 

Because clearly McCoy is either so obtuse that he is not aware of this lack of productivity in the final moments of the game, or he has tried for three and a half seasons and nothing has worked. The last time I checked, the Chargers play in the National Football League; professional football teams take the field every game. Is there any one team that if they are behind heading into the last quarter, just plain gives up? These players are playing for a starting position, a bigger contract, a long-term contract…etc.  

 

Whether it is holding onto a lead, or trying to dig out of a hole, the simple fact is that this Chargers team, since McCoy took over, CAN NOT CLOSE OUT GAMES.

 

Sure, the coaches do not take the field – the players have to execute. However whose job is it to make the right play calling? Whose job is it to encourage and be positive around the players to ensure they will continue to fight for the whole 60 minutes? Whose job is it to make sure the players are in the right position to execute?  

 

To have your play calling questioned after so many games is getting tiresome. Perhaps it is time to admit that McCoy just does not have what it takes to close out games. If he did, if he had the aggressive confidence the team needs, San Diego’s record would be more around 9-1 or 8-2, rather than a pathetic 4-6.

 

I know most of you anti-McCoy constituents have been feeling this way for a while now. I am big enough to eat crow and admit that this just isn’t the massive injuries, or the lack of execution causing the team to fail. There needs to be a change, otherwise this team will not change.

 

One possible solution:  Bring Hoffman in to coach in the fourth quarter of every game.  He can even wear a visor backwards if he wants.

 

Source: athletespeakers.com

Source: athletespeakers.com

 

Thanks for reading

 

Brian “Big Kahuna” Scott   

@BWK_72

Image result for chargers fishing

I don’t know about you, but if I have a great vacation planned on Monday, I have a hard time focusing on being productive at work on Friday. Someone better say or do something to keep me focused on my job or I might as well stay home. Apparently, the Chargers players feel the same way. Since Mike McCoy took over as Head Coach (HC) of the Chargers, the team is 1-3 the week before the bye. Their only win coming against a very poor Jacksonville team. So, am I suggesting that coaching has something to do with the team losing focus? You bet I am! Taking a look at recent Chargers history, it seems the better the coach, the better the team stays focused the week before the bye.

So let us take a look at the last three Chargers coaches and see how each one did before the bye. We will go in reverse order, starting with Mike McCoy. This is McCoy’s fourth season as the Chargers Head Coach. He has had four opportunities to go to the bye with momentum. He has squandered three of those opportunities. Time to take a look at McCoy’s 1-3 pre-bye record:

Year          Week          Opponent                    W/L          Score

2016          10                Dolphins                        L              24-31

2015           9                 Bears                               L              19-24

2014           9                 Dolphins                        L               0-37

2013           7                 Jaguars                           W              24-6

Those are not exactly juggernauts that the Bolts fell to the last three years. Although the Chargers are not to be confused with a team that contends for the championship each season, they are certainly good enough to win against this competition. It appears to this viewer that the Chargers do not come out to play going into a bye under Mike McCoy.

Okay, so maybe the players are mentally fishing, hunting, or golfing while they await permission to leave for vacation. Is that really on Mike McCoy? Not completely, but in my humble opinion he should shoulder much of the blame.

Despite the negative opinion that most Chargers fans have about former HC, Norv Turner, I think most would agree that he was better than McCoy. Turner did lead the team to as high as a 12-4 record during his tenure. Yes, he did have a very nice roster to work with, but he still had to coach and motivate the team. Turner’s record going into a bye very much resembles the average coach that he was. Norv teams were 3-3 the day before vacation. Here is the breakdown:

2012          6               Broncos                           L                24-35

2011           5              Broncos                           W               29-24

2010          9              Texans                             W               29-23

2009         4              Steelers                            L                28-38

2008         8              Saints                               L                32-37

2007          6              Raiders                           W               28-14

Now let us take a peak at a coach who was considered a winner, a disciplinarian, and a leader. Yes, Marty Schottenheimer was the Chargers HC for five seasons. Schottenheimer was known for not allowing his players to lose focus. He kept his players accountable. They knew that if they slacked off, they would be invited to watch the rest of the game from the bench. It is no coincidence that his record going into a bye was excellent. Here is what Marty accomplished:

2006         2             Titans                               W                 40-7

2005         9             Jets                                   W                 31-26

2004         9             Saints                               W                43-17

2003         5             Jaguars                             L                   21-27

2002         7             Raiders                             W                27-21

Sure enough, the Chargers, under Schottenheimer were a very respectable 4-1 heading into a bye. Before you start talking about how great the players were in Marty’s day, remember he had teams that went 8-8, 4-12 and 9-7 to go along with his 12-4 and 14-2 teams.

In this writer’s opinion, there is no doubt that a coaches ability to keep his team motivated and focused on the goal at hand, rather than their upcoming vacation, is paramount to a team’s success. What is your opinion? Please leave your comments below. I’ll get back to you. #gobolts!

 

 

New San Diego Chargers head coach Mike McCoy pauses during an NFL football news conference, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013, in San Diego. The former offensive coordinator for the Denver Broncos replaces Norv Turner, who was fired along with general manager A.J. Smith after the Chargers finished 7-9 and missed the playoffs for the third straight season. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

New San Diego Chargers head coach Mike McCoy pauses during an NFL football news conference, Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013, in San Diego. The former offensive coordinator for the Denver Broncos replaces Norv Turner, who was fired along with general manager A.J. Smith after the Chargers finished 7-9 and missed the playoffs for the third straight season. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

 

So much for sweeping divisional rival Denver in 2016.  So much for a divisional win on the road.  The Chargers lost 27-19 in what was, at times, a typical gritty divisional game and what was, at other times, a complete slop-fest branded as football.

There were really seven plays that could be pointed to as reasons the Chargers lost.

The first was a missed field goal by Josh Lambo from 45 yards out with 59 seconds left in the first half.  He simply hooked the kick for his first miss inside of 50 yards this year.

The next was a blocked point after attempt by Lambo with 4:09 left in the third quarter.

This is where it gets ugly and where my hatred for Mike McCoy grows.

After a Casey Hayward pick six from the Denver 16 with about eight minutes to play, McCoy makes the right INITIAL decision to go for a two point conversion.  It was the right decision because the Chargers were down by five.  A successful two point conversion makes the deficit three points.  What was wrong about the decision was to throw the ball from two yards out.  Too many things can go wrong.  Some did go wrong.  Antonio Gates was called for offensive pass interference, running an illegal pick play.  Back the ball up 10 yards to the 12 and now a pass play is the only option.  Everyone knows that and another Philip Rivers pass was batted up in the air by a Denver defensive lineman.

Fast forward to 2:54 left to play.  The Chargers are at the Denver two yard line with first and goal to go.  The offense runs not one, not two, not three, but four pass plays — all of which fell incomplete — to turn the ball over on downs.  Most teams would bring in their heavy personnel package — three tight ends, blocking back and tailback and cram the ball down the defense’s throat.  The Chargers running game was somewhat effective this week, so it’s reasonable to expect Melvin Gordon could manage two yards.  Instead, the offense comes away empty-handed.

These five play call decisions and the quote below exemplify why Mike McCoy is unfit to be a Head Coach in the National Football League.

mcnorv

 

 

 

Really, Mikeyboy?  You don’t say!

I know that Ken Whisenhunt is the Offensive Coordinator and play caller.  Mike McCoy, as Head Coach is Ken’s boss and should have overruled him and didn’t.  He kept his hands in his pockets.  The definition of insanity is trying the same thing over and over, expecting different results.  I humbly submit Mike McCoy is insane by this definition.  To make matters worse, Whisenhunt pulled a Norv and got the plays late to Rivers so there wasn’t enough time on the play clock to change out of the stupid calls.

What say you, BoltBlitz readers?  Am I blinded by my hatred for McCoy?

Mike Pisciotta

zombie

The fall season is upon us and many around the globe are rejoicing in the change of the season. For those who aspire for change, one needs to just breathe in the autumn air – breathe in fresh hope. Opportunities are no longer looked at as futile, they are viewed as worthy of accomplishment and realistically within reach.

 

For sports fans, this season brings us baseball playoffs, the beginning of basketball and hockey while placing us right in the middle of the NFL football schedule.

 

For those lovers of horror, fall also brings Halloween; a tradition steeped in scary music and movies.  

 

Being a horror enthusiast myself, I have spent all October basking in new and old horror movies; entranced in the scare and the music that enhances each killer moment. All over the internet, anyone can find a website or blog with the writer’s favorite horror movies.  In my opinion, the scariest thing I have seen this October?

 

The San Diego Chargers offense in Sunday’s loss in Denver.

 

How many times, in cheeky horror movies, do we see opportunity after opportunity for the potential victim to escape the psychotic killer, only to stay in and lock the doors and hide in a closet.  When this occurs, the viewer usually screams “RUN YOU IDIOT!! RUN!!”

 

Were there any Charger fans yelling that at the television late in the game Sunday??

 

run

Avid horror viewers constantly see chances the victim has in escaping the evil assassin.  Week 8’s loss in Denver, there were numerous chances for the Chargers to escape yet, just like the “dumb blonde” in the movies, they failed miserably.  

 

A running into the kicker penalty, a dropped potential pick-six, first and goal on the Broncos two yard line, defense creating countless three-and-outs; all major opportunities to escape and turn around the plot – where the prey becomes the slayer.

 

Regarding the play-calling or the lack of execution, when it comes to making critical decisions in a state of panic, can we really sit back in our comfy chairs and criticize?  How many of us have been stalked by the likes of Michael Myers or Jason Voorhees?  Furthermore, how many of us have coached in the NFL?

 

Like myself, most of us would say that without a doubt, we would run as far away as possible and never return to our home if the creepy knife carrying murderer would not leave.  In addition, most Charger fans would have elected to run the ball with time running out and an opportunity to score from two yards out – yet in an intense game full of emotion, can we really say we would make the right choice?

 

In my opinion, Mike McCoy and Ken Whisenhunt suspected that a tough Denver defense was looking for Melvin Gordon to run.  Gordon had been piling up yards and has already shown to have a nose for pay dirt – so running Melvin was obvious from everyone watching the game.  With that line of thinking, what they did was counter with passes; one which if not overthrown, Antonio Gates would have had added another touchdown to his resume.  Unfortunately, coaches are not able to possess hindsight and neither are the seemingly brainless victims in slasher films.

 

John Pagano and his defense handed the offense a chance to wreak havoc in Denver, time and time again Sunday.  They allowed the door to remain impenetrable for the serial killer to get through – yet the stooge somehow continued to slip and fall.  With an arsenal of talented weapons to escape Sports Authority Field with a victory, the Chargers fell even harder to the AFC West cellar.  

 

So what happens now with the killer still out there and the injured victim who is lying on the floor of the cellar, seems to have lost all hope?  

 

“Just get back to the lab. Just keep working….”  – Melvin Ingram

reanimator

Let’s hope the Chargers offense gets reanimated as they head towards the second half of the NFL season.  At 3-5, San Diego desperately needs life to be pumped back into the staff and personnel if they want to cheat a certain death; a playoff-less season.

 

Brian “Big Kahuna” Scott .  

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