Deflategate

lynch2

 

When 80% of the league shows up to see you work out, that’s a good thing. For quarterback Paxton Lynch, formerly of the Memphis Tigers, that was the case on Wednesday. At his Pro Day workout, 26 of the 32 NFL teams had representatives present.

That’s a good problem to have.

Lynch is widely regarded as the third-best quarterback prospect in the 2016 NFL Draft behind University of California stud Jared Goff and North Dakota State University signal caller Carson Wentz.

Per ESPN, Lynchs’ Pro day workout consisted of 70 scripted passes, of which only 10 were scheduled to be from the shotgun formation. Lynch operated from shotgun his entire tenure at Memphis. In eschewing the shotgun, Lynch intended to show he can effectively run a pro-style offense which requires operating predominantly from under center.

Lynch held his workout outdoors with thunderstorms on the horizon, causing the workout to be moved up 45 minutes. In the elements, most particularly 25-mile-per-hour swirling winds, he completed 57 of his 69 attempts.  Lynch’s agent, the legendary Leigh Steinberg, described the workout as “pretty spectacular.”

What else would you expect an agent to say?

However, the fact Lynch did not cancel his workout given his throwing conditions speaks volumes. Conditions like that are going to happen in the NFL. His ability to hit those passes only increases his draft stock. Lynch will be given a pass for his missed passes but will be given extra credit due to his accuracy. It’s a brilliant play from what looks to be a very intelligent, well-prepared quarterback.

Now the hard part begins.

Those 26 teams are going to want to see Lynch in person and put him through their own drills. That brings us to this nugget from NFL Insider Ian Rapoport:

 

Would the San Diego Chargers seriously consider tapping Lynch in the NFL Draft? The Chargers still have a lot of holes to fill, but the role of heir apparent to Philip Rivers has been a role that has been largely ignored. The Bolts would have to use their second-round pick, technically pick number 34 since New England was docked a first-round draft pick due to the Deflategate scandal, to pick Lynch.

That’s a pretty high investment for a player who will only see the field in the preseason. But the question remains, is it worth it?

Per NFL.com,  Lynch stands an imposing 6-foot-7, 244 lbs., boasts a 36-inch vertical jump and 118-inch broad jump (best among all QBs) while running the 40-yard dash in 4.86 seconds. Lynch has the size, strength, mobility and, most importantly, the time to watch and learn from a future Hall-of-Fame quarterback in Philip Rivers. Rivers himself sat and learned from Drew Brees for two seasons until it was his time to take the reigns in San Diego. Lynch would find himself coming into an identical situation. Check out these clips from his Pro Day:

Still don’t think Tom Telesco would pull the trigger on a quarterback so early? Consider this fact. New Chargers offensive coordinator Ken Whisenhunt was at the Pro Day and he specifically asked Lynch to throw specific routes during the workout. Chargers management is looking to answer the dilemma of life after Rivers and they know Kellen Clemens is not the answer.

The Chargers have eight draft picks to use in seven rounds. Plenty of moves could still be made, even if they do take Lynch at the top of the second round.

Options in play include packaging picks to move into the second round for a second time. We all know how GM Tom Telesco likes to trade up by now…

Like most things in life, you get what you pay for. A second-round pick is paying a lot, but the return could be greater than the investment, in the end. It’s time to fill the potential starter role once and for all, and this is a great place to start. This move would get my full support.

Would you endorse the Chargers drafting Paxton Lynch in the second round? Leave your thoughts below.

 

Bolt Up!!

 

The Greg One

 

#TelescoMagic

sydney

Word got out last week that the NFL was not going to permit the Seau family to attend or present San Diego Chargers legend Junior Seau into the Hall of Fame. The NFL Hall-Of-Fame enshrinement ceremony will take place on August 8th.

Many subplots surround this story. In a tragic end to a great story, Junior took his own life and it was later revealed he suffered from CTE. In medical terms, CTE is Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

This is the definition of CTE, as taken directly from the Boston University CTE center:

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain found in athletes (and others) with a history of repetitive brain trauma, including symptomatic concussions as well as asymptomatic subconcussive hits to the head. CTE has been known to affect boxers since the 1920s. However, recent reports have been published of neuropathologically confirmed CTE in retired professional football players and other athletes who have a history of repetitive brain trauma.

This trauma triggers progressive degeneration of the brain tissue, including the build-up of an abnormal protein called tau.  These changes in the brain can begin months, years, or even decades after the last brain trauma or end of active athletic involvement.  The brain degeneration is associated with memory loss, confusion, impaired judgment, impulse control problems, aggression, depression, and, eventually, progressive dementia.

This and other medical information is something the NFL has long had access to but neglected to use, hence, the eventual settlement. The concussions incurred from Seau’s relentless playing style as one of if not the league’s best middle linebackers in his time period is the cause of his CTE. However, Seau was not once diagnosed with a concussion during his playing career.

Over the last three years the effects of concussions and a greater emphasis on player safety has become a priority. In January 2014, a 675-million concussion settlement was reached in litigation between the NFL vs. retired NFL players and their families. The settlement was rejected by federal judges, then ultimately became an uncapped monetary settlement in April 2015, ensuring all retired players requiring money for their illnesses were accommodated.

Junior himself said he wanted his daughter Sydney to induct him into the Hall-of-Fame. The NFL told Sydney Seau she could speak at the induction ceremony then eventually changed their minds. The reason for their reversal of course is a five-year-old policy declaring families can’t speak for players inducted posthumously. Seau ended his life in 2012.

The NFL is allowing a five-minute highlight reel to be played as his induction piece, 60% longer than the two-minute highlight package given to other players.

Hold your applause…

The league is obviously afraid of what the family would have to say. After all, the family does have a lawsuit filed against the NFL in light of the CTE findings and the NFL’s hiding of such information from its players. It’s a legitimate fear from the league.  The last thing they want is family members creating a scene over their inductee, who literally gave his life to the game. It only takes one to ruin it for the rest.

That’s never happened. It wouldn’t with Sydney Seau.

The Seau family wouldn’t want the last public image of Junior and their family to be a rambling, chaotic diatribe against the NFL. Sydney Seau reveres her father and would add nothing but class to the proceedings in a tribute fitting of an NFL legend.

The NFL also mentioned time constraints.

TIME constraints.

For those of you who haven’t watched an NFL Hall-Of-Fame induction ceremony, it lasts for five to six hours. The inductees take the podium and talk…and talk…and talk. They start at childhood and almost give a year by year synopsis of their life. These speeches can and usually do go for an hour or more. What we see on Sportscenter are the few seconds of material that won’t put us to sleep. Let’s start with cutting their podium time if you want a streamlined show. Time is logic almost as ludicrous as the family induction rule.

Five minutes isn’t worthy of a man who is arguably one of the greatest middle ever linebackers to compete in the NFL. Five minutes isn’t worthy of a 12-time Pro Bowler, NFL Defensive player of the year, member of the NFL’s 40th and 50th anniversary team, and 1990’s All-Decade team.

Five minutes isn’t worthy of a man who, in his greatest game, was literally single-handedly responsible for the Chargers 1994 AFC Championship game victory over the favored Pittsburgh Steelers. In that game, Seau recorded 16 tackles playing with a pinched nerve in his neck that left him without the feeling in his left arm.

In reality, the NFL is missing a golden opportunity. In a perfect world, this is what would happen. Sydney Seau would get fifteen minutes of podium time, short and sweet by HOF standards. She would have time to lovingly speak from her heart and for the family. She would make no mention of the CTE, just of what Junior meant as a son, brother, father and community activist.

After Sydney’s’ speech is concluded she would be joined at the podium by Roger Goodell, who would lead the audience in another round of applause. After a warm hug and a few seconds posing for photographers, Goodell himself would speak about CTE and what the NFL is doing to improve the safety of its players. He could then take a moment to offer his condolences to Sydney and use Junior’s life as a message to the NFL to get players treatment now so this doesn’t happen in the future.

Simply put, the NFL is hiding something they need to be bringing more attention to and this is a great forum to address it.

Standing next to Sydney Seau in a show of solidarity would send a strong message. It would speak to the retired players and legends in attendance. It would speak to over 4000 players who have lawsuits filed against the NFL right now. It’s an acknowledgement of the league’s compassion for the players that made the NFL what it is today. It’s a chance to get some good press amidst the ongoing Deflategate scandal and endless suspensions surrounding the upcoming season. It’s a chance to abolish a flawed rule and a chance to increase the luster of the shield instead of tarnishing the families behind it.

 

Tell the NFL how you feel. Use the hashtag.

 

#LetSydneySeauSpeak

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