4-3 Defense

Russell Wilson, Melvin Ingram

 

On Sunday, June 11, the Chargers locked up a clutch piece of their young up-and-coming defense in Melvin Ingram.

The former Gamecock signed a big four-year, $66 million deal, ending what could have been an annoying contractual standoff, and Chargers got it done far before the mid-July deadline.

As mentioned from the Chargers’ front office, both sides were eager to get a deal done and wasted no time agreeing on numbers. This proves to be very big for the Chargers because this means Melvin will be there for all of mini-camp and training camp.

On February 27 2017, the Chargers placed the always nagging Franchise Tag on Ingram, thinking it would take an extended amount of time to come to terms, but doing so in four months is extremely beneficial for both parties and to the chemistry of the defense.

Ingram was drafted in the first round of the 2012 draft and was supposed to be a impact player right away. The South Carolina product had a slow rookie year and the next two seasons after that he only played in 13 games out of 32.

However, he bounced back his last two seasons, playing in all 32 games notching 18.5 sacks, 11 pass deflections and seven forced fumbles. He proved that, when on the field, he can play at a high level. He developed an early reputation his first couple of years as an “almost” player; almost getting sacks, almost affecting plays. But he has shown the past two seasons that he’s more than learned how to impact games and get to the quarterback more efficiently.

The drafting of Joey Bosa last year has helped him because teams must worry about not one explosive motor but now they must gameplan for two pass-rushing freaks of nature. The two didn’t get a chance to play together in all of the games cause of Bosa’s contract issues. During the 12 games the duo did play together in ’16, they combined for 18.5 sacks.

It is going to be really interesting to see how they fare with an entire offseason and season together. It seems they both complement each other well and, in that, their numbers will only get better. Ingram also was tied for 6th in the league with QB hurries (29) and producing a team-high 23 QB hits. That is pretty damn good for an “Almost player.”

The Bolts adding Gus Bradley as their defensive coordinator means a switch from 3-4 to 4-3, meaning Ingram will have plenty of chances to knock opposing signal callers on their asses.

As a fan, we hate seeing big money contracts given out, especially because injuries can happen at any given time. But Ingram has earned it. Now, let’s see him terrorize offenses for a full 16 games, thus leading the team formerly located in America’s finest city back to the postseason dance.

One more thing: can we possibly get Melvin to make a theme song for the Chargers going forward? I, for one, think it would be extremely dope! Maybe we can all ask him on twitter and get it going?!

There is a link below to one on Melvin’s tracks:

 

 

 

Thanks for checking out my article. I appreciate all of y’all for doing so.

Charlie LaFurno

@CharlieMack29

ChargerDefense

Over a month ago the San Diego Chargers drafted defensive end Joey Bosa with their third overall pick. Along with Bosa the Chargers drafted two more defensive players. One of them was Bosa’s running mate at Ohio State, Joshua Perry. These look to be great additions combined with the free agent signings of defensive tackle Brandon Mebane and safety Dwight Lowery.

Some Chargers fans are clamoring for the Chargers to switch defensive schemes. I’ll tell you why this can not and will not happen anytime soon. First, I’ll tell you the difference between the two schemes. For the purpose of this piece it will just be a base 3-4 scheme versus the base 4-3 scheme. After this I will give my opinion on why switching schemes wouldn’t be beneficial for the Bolts moving forward.

I’ve stated in a previous article (Bolt Up For Bosa) that the Chargers only run their base scheme about 50% of defensive snaps. It’s these 50% of snaps I will be focusing on. That being said what is a 3-4 defense? It has been used famously by Bum Phillips, the father of Wade Phillips.

Used by the Houston Oilers in the 70’s, it’s predicated on pressure by overwhelming the offensive line with multiple attacking defensive players. If used correctly this scheme can be virtually unstoppable. This was defensive scheme used most brilliantly by the Denver Broncos to defeat the Carolina Panthers in this past years’ Super Bowl.

The 3-4 was the staple of Dick LeBeau’s defense which helped drive multiple teams to Super Bowl appearances. Lebeaus’ defense has yielded two wins and four losses in the Super Bowl. In New England, the 3-4 has been the driving force behind the Patriots dynasty. Yes, Tom Brady has made his throws but its been the defense that’s given the Patriots four Super Bowl titles in 15 years.

Breaking it down the 3-4 consists of three down linemen and four linebackers. The four linebackers have endless possibilities on how they can be placed. There’s a multitude of packages to utilize. This makes the 3-4 a hard defense to plan against. With four linebackers you don’t know who is blitzing or who is dropping back in coverage. The point of a 3-4 defense is mismatches. It’s built to stop the run and apply endless amount of pressure on the opposing teams’ offensive line. In theory, the Chargers should be good at run-stopping although this has been the Achilles’ heel of the defense over the past several years.

 

Here’s a diagram of a basic 3-4 defense.

34defense.png (574×288)

 

So how will the Chargers look defensively? Let’s start with the defensive line. At left defensive end will be Corey Liuget. Anchoring the middle will be nose tackle Brandon Mebane. At right defensive end will be Joey Bosa. At weak side outside linebacker will be Jerry Attaochu. The inside linebacker will be Manti Te’o. The middle linebacker will be Denzel Perrymen. The strong side linebacker will be Melvin Ingram.

Anchoring the back end of the defense from left to right will be left cornerback Jason Verrett. At Free Safety will be Dwight Lowery. Next to him will be strong safety Jahleel Addae. The right cornerback will be Brandon Flowers. Keep in mind this is how it stands right now. A lot depends on training camp and if the Chargers sign other free agents.

So now know how the Chargers will run their basic 3-4 defense. What is a 4-3 defense? The base 4-3 first came to us under Tom Landry when he was the Giants defensive coordinator in the 1950’s. He then made it even more famous with the Dallas Cowboys and through their vaunted “Doomsday” defense. Ever since, there’s been multiple variations of the scheme from the Bill Parcells stack defense to the Wide-9 defense famously used by the Philadelphia Eagles.

On to the basis of the 4-3. It’s four down linemen and three linebackers. In its most basic form the four down linemen will always have their hands in the ground and be in pursuit of whomever has the ball. The three linebackers are in charge of coverage in this base defense although they may blitz in certain packages.
Here’s a diagram of a basic 4-3 defense.

base_4-3.jpg (600×387)

The Chargers run a variation of the 4-3 in a hybrid nickel package. The nickel package features Melvin Ingram and Jerry Attaochu with their hands in the dirt. The 3-4 defense has been implemented since 2001 when Marty Schottenheimer took  over as head coach. Since then the Chargers have had a few dominant defenses in ’06, ’07, ’09 and 2010. Its been proven very effective when the right pieces are in place. In 2016 this is such the case. My main reason for this belief is Joey Bosa and the signing of cornerback Casey Hayward. The Hayward addition was an amazing pick up.

It’s all about the anchor of the 3-4, the nose tackle. A viable anchor is something the Chargers have lacked for so long. Since the days of Jamal Williams its been a revolving door at this position. Brandon Mebane probably didn’t make headlines to the casual Chargers fan. I believe this is the most underrated pickup of the whole offseason. Mebane can garner double- and sometimes even triple-teams.

This defense, hell, this whole team is going too shock a lot of people. As I said earlier the 3-4 requires almost pure selflessness from its three down linemen. It starts with Mebane. I may call him Bane by seasons’ end. If you know Batman then you understand the reference. Its been five years in the making with this defense. Why change philosophies now when this defense is so close to grasping greatness? Its proven to be a dominant defense in the past. It can and will be for years to come.

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