Monthly Archives: September 2016

ingram3

 

Melvin Ingram stated that he had things to show this year.

All the time he has spent studying film, all the hard work and sweat have coalesced into an opportunity he might have briefly thought about: defensive captain. On Wednesday, the Chargers named Ingram as the player who would wear the big “C” on his jersey in place of Manti Te’o, who was recently placed on IR (Achilles’ tear). The other defensive captain is nose tackle Brandon Mebane.

“I ain’t showed nothing,” Ingram told U-T San Diego back in June. “I have so much to show…It ain’t even started. You ain’t even seen what I got going on…When the season starts, everyone is going to see. It’s fixing to get real.”

 

 

 

The fifth-year pro appears to still carry a chip on his shoulder as a result of having missed 25 games in a little more than a year due to injuries. The 2015 campaign was his first full 16-game season since his 2012 rookie year. First there was the torn ACL which occurred May 14, 2013, during OTAs. He did not return to action until early December. Next came the hip injury sustained in a 2014 game against the Seahawks that caused him to miss seven weeks of playing time.

I think after all that adversity I’d be frustrated too!

Through the first three games of 2016, the former South Carolina Gamecock has pretty much matched the statistics of his initial year. Already, No. 54 has collected a combined eight tackles with seven of those being individual efforts. Additionally, Ingram has totaled two sacks, a forced fumble (FF) and a lone defended pass. In his first four career games, he was well on is way to being a force with seven solo tackles and an assist, three PDs and one FF.

In April of 2015, Tom Telesco and the Chargers chose to exercise the fifth-year option of Ingram’s rookie contract. It is worth $7.751 million, per Spotrac.com. It includes a guarantee for injury and becomes fully guaranteed should the stud linebacker be on the roster come Day 1 of the 2017 League Year.

The 2016 season is indeed a year in which “SupaMelvin” will be showcasing his worth from now until December. He will be an unrestricted free agent in 2017, so he is also playing for the future. Whether that career remains in San Diego or continues elsewhere is unknown.

Fellow teammate Jeremiah Attaochu said it best to Ricky Henne of Chargers.com: “He is a leader first and foremost. And he does it all by example with the way he comes out there each day and plays. He is motivating to all of us with the way he does that. We need that right now as a defense with Manti going down. When Melvin speaks, everyone listens.”

The future is now for Ingram, and if he can get back to the level of play he was on the last nine games of 2015, he’ll receive a large contract and, most likely, remain with the Chargers for the foreseeable future.

Thanks for reading!

Cheryl White

@BoltnUp

chargerssaints

 

This Sunday marks the first time Drew Brees makes his return to San Diego since leaving in free agency for the Saints in March of 2006. Brees owns a 2-0 record against the Chargers since his departure from America’s finest city.

While the Chargers are a couple of plays and injuries away from being 3-0, the Saints are as well. New Orleans looked as if they were going to go 1-0 until the Raiders scored with 52 seconds left and Jack Del Rio elected to go for two and the win instead of the tie. The Saints failed to get into field goal range and lost a heartbreaker to fall to 0-1.

Sound familiar?

The Chargers lost a heartbreaker to the Chiefs in Week 1, as well. In Week 2, the Saints’ defense held the New York Giants’ offense in check, but lost a tough one 16-13; largely in part to a blocked field goal attempt which was returned for a touchdown.

Their Week 3 contest proved no different, as they lost a shootout to the Falcons 45-32. The Saints have fallen to 0-4 only twice in the Drew Brees’ era, and one of those seasons – 2012 – they ended their losing skid against the Chargers.

Brees is an excellent Quarterback. Despite being vertically challenged for his position, it makes me appreciate his game even more having to stand on his toes to make plays at times. He has a serious weapon who cannot be overlooked in Brandin Cooks, who I believe is a better version of T.Y Hilton, and can cause serious problems for this defense come Sunday if they aren’t well prepared.

Mark Ingram a solid back who’s off to a bit of a slow start but San Diego is notorious for letting players get hot. Willie Snead has emerged as a top target for Brees, but he has a toe injury that caused him to miss his last start against the Falcons. Should he play against the Bolts this Sunday, containing him and Cooks will be a really tough challenge.

I can see this game being a high-scoring shootout, seeing as the New Orleans’ defense ranks 31st in the league. They’re giving up 299 passing yards a game and 149.3 yards on the ground.

San Diego’s defense ranks 25th in the league, giving up 322 passing yards a game and 81 yards on the ground.

Drew Brees currently is 1st in the league passing with eight touchdowns and only one interception while throwing for 1,025 yards.

On the other side, Philip Rivers has 755 passing yards with five TDs and no interceptions. Granted, San Diego is a more leveled offense this year having more running plays than passing plays and the Saints have been in two shootouts; so it warrants a team to pass more than run.

Let’s take a look at how the Brees-Rivers matchup has looked in 2012 and 2008.

In 2012, the Chargers and Saints played a close game in which the Saints came out on top 31-24. A couple of questionable calls on the last drive ultimately stalled the Chargers from possibly tying the game up. A couple of holding calls and an offensive pass interference killed all the momentum the Bolts had going on their final drive. Rivers passed for 354 yards with a pair of touchdowns and one interception, while Brees threw for 370 yards slinging four passing scores and one interception.

In 2008, it was a similar result. The Saints took that matchup, 37-32. Brees and Rivers had identical numbers in that matchup as well, throwing for three touchdowns and roughly 340 yards.

Historically, the Saints have been a tough team for the Chargers to beat. It is like Brees has the cheat sheet to barely escape with victories over his former team. In my opinion, this game on Sunday will once again be a close one. There are a couple of things that the Chargers need to do and do well to keep Brees and company. on their toes and against the ropes.

 

Melvin Gordon has had a good year up to this point, scoring a TD in every game so far and two in Week 2. His four rushing scores tie him for the league-lead in rushing touchdowns. He currently has 194 yards and has been running with confidence and has patience. He has not fumbled yet this year in 54 carries (I’m hoping I don’t jinx him). He will play a huge role in this game. I want to forget about that Colts’ game as a whole, because I felt like while the Chargers only lost by four, they should’ve won by at least seven. They were out of sync for a large part of the game.

Which brings me to my next key: Philip Rivers trusting his receivers.

Philip looked off that game, missing a wide-open touchdown to the newly acquired Dexter McCluster in the endzone, and a crucial 3rd down to wideout Travis Benjamin which would’ve essentially put the nail in the coffin and given the Chargers the win.

It is never easy losing your top two targets and having your No. 1 all-time target out for the game, but Philip must find a way to get on the same page with his receivers. Benjamin is almost always open and Tyrell Williams is a beast waiting to be awakened. They did look as if they were going to make an interesting ending to the game, until rookie tight end Hunter Henry fumbled on the 40-yard line. But that doesn’t take anything away from what Henry has done. He’s been brilliant for the Chargers, especially as a blocker, but he has flashed some of the receiving ability that made the Bolts select him in the second round of this year’s draft.

Lastly, my final key is getting a consistent pass rush. Melvin Ingram, the newly elected team captain after Te’o went down for the season with a torn Achilles, will have a big game here. He has two sacks on the season so and he happens to be in a contract year. Due to his recently appointed captaincy and the fact that he is in a contract year, I think a flame will be lit under his tail to kick it into high gear and perform consistently the way we all know he can.

 

So, with all that being said, I believe the Chargers can squeak out a win despite Drew Brees being hungry and being eager to return to the Q to play the NFL team who drafted him. It will be a back-and-forth affair with the Chargers pulling ahead by 10 late in the 4th for a 31-21 Chargers victory and the Bolts will move to 2-2.

Let me know what you think below in the comments section, Chargers fans.

 

Charlie LaFurno

@CharlieMack29

riversbrees

 

 

Let us begin with one seemingly simple, yet frequently argued truth: the Chargers made the right decision when they let Drew Brees get away.

Those with 20/20 hindsight see how great Brees became and know that he won a ring with New Orleans. They look at his accomplishments after leaving San Diego and compare them to the success, or lack thereof, of the Chargers under Rivers, and envy the fans of the Saints.

That being said, be honest with yourself, Drew Brees was seriously injured in his last game in San Diego and, quite frankly, his performance with the Chargers was average at best.

Please allow me to refresh your memory.

During the Brees’ tenure in San Diego, he was very hit-or-miss. In his first season, he sat the bench and learned behind fan-favorite Doug Flutie. In his sophomore year, 2002, he won the starting role, but was only able to throw for a little over 3200 yards with 17 touchdowns and 16 interceptions, adding two fumbles. Not bad for a first-year starter, but he lead the team to a middling 8-8 record.

Brees came back as the starter in 2003 and only amassed 2100 yards with 11 touchdowns, 15 picks, and four fumbles. He was benched by then head coach Marty Schottenheimer and replaced by Flutie. Despite the efforts of Hall of Fame running back LaDainian Tomlinson, the team ended up just 4-12 that season. With Brees seemingly heading in the wrong direction, the Chargers’ brain trust decided that it was time to draft a quarterback.

Enter Philip Rivers.

In 2004, Brees could see the writing on the wall. The Chargers traded for Philip Rivers on draft day and he was the heir apparent to the starting QB job.

Brees’ days were numbered indeed.

Fortunately for Drew, Philip decided to hold out for more money and missed most of training camp. Coach Schottenheimer decided that he could not afford to start their new $40 MIL rookie and put Brees back in his familiar role.

Well, one thing we all know about Drew Brees in current times is that when his back is against the wall, he will come out fighting. He went on to throw for over 3100 yards with 27 touchdowns, against just 7 interceptions and four fumbles. This was by far his most productive season, as he lead his team to an amazing 12-4 record.

What do you do with a quarterback who just lead your team from worst to first in a single year? You start him the next year!

The 2005 campaign rolls around and Rivers is sent to the bench once more. That holdout is proving very costly to the sophomore QB. This was the last season on Brees’ contract. Something had to be decided by the end of the year. Two quarterbacks’ futures were on the line as the season wore on. Brees was quite inconsistent in 2005. He amassed just under 3600 yards and 24 touchdowns, but his interceptions ballooned back up to 15 and his fumbles up to eight!

The decision was going to be tough.

With the team going 9-7 and Brees showing signs of greatness along with signs of ineptitude, no one was sure whom the Chargers would keep.

Word was leaked out that general manager AJ Smith wanted to keep Rivers. Head coach Marty Schottenheimer liked Brees.

Who would win the job?

As it turned out, that difficult decision was made quite easy. Despite many who thought Brees should not play the meaningless final game of the season, Schottenheimer decided he should. Many speculated that Brees got the start because Schottenheimer did not want to showcase what Rivers could do and keep AJ Smith from offering Brees a contract extension.

Whatever the reason was, it backfired in a big way.

While attempting to recover a fumble, Brees suffered a severely torn labrum in his throwing shoulder. This injury is not considered an automatic career-ender, but many do not return with the same arm strength. Brees was not considered a strong-armed QB to begin with, so the thought of him coming back weaker was not attractive. Also, the thought of letting go of their $40 MIL bonus baby was eating away at AJ Smith.

Smith made the call. With Brees’ numbers declining and it being impossible to determine if and when he would recover from his injury, it was time to part ways; thus opening the door for Philip Rivers, who lead the Chargers to a 14-2 record the following season.

With Rivers and Tomlinson playing at an extremely high level, it was obvious that Smith made the right call. Hell, even the Dolphins, who brought Brees in for a workout, refused to sign him. They opted instead for aging veteran Daunte Culpepper. That proved to be an extremely poor decision.

Yet again, when you tell the undersized Drew Brees that he can’t do something, he gets determined to prove you wrong. Brees rehabbed his shoulder and came back stronger than ever before. The New Orleans Saints decided to take a shot and signed him as their new starting QB. Just four years later, Drew Brees was hoisting the Lombardi Trophy high in the air and celebrating his Super Bowl victory with the Saints. He was the king of New Orleans and the top passer in the NFL.

Sunday, October 2, 2016, Drew Brees returns to his roots. He will once again grace the field at Qualcomm stadium in front of thousands of adoring fans who think about what could have been.

You see, Drew Brees didn’t leave San Diego in an ugly fashion. There may have been no love lost between Brees and the Chargers’ front office, but with the community, all was well. In fact, Brees still lives in San Diego in the offseason and is a pillar of the community.

There is no question that the success that Brees has seen in his brilliant career in New Orleans has helped revisionist historians question the decision to let him go. That being said, what choice did the Chargers have? Keep an ailing, undersized, average quarterback? Or, give the young stud who they had invested so heavily his opportunity to shine?

In reality, the decision worked out for both teams. Brees found the perfect situation, team, city and coach to allow his skills to flourish. Rivers stepped in and quickly made fans believers. In fact, they are both considered to be future Hall of Fame QBs by many experts.

My question is, if Brees did not get injured, would he ever have had the chip on his shoulder that allowed him to build up his strength and become a far stronger and more deadly quarterback than he was in his first five years?

We will never know the answer to that question, so the debate goes on.

Thanks for reading. Please  leave your comments below and I’ll be sure to get back to you.

Go Bolts! #VoteYesOnC

Will McCafferty

Manti4

 

Well, this time it wasn’t an offensive player that left a Chargers’ game with an injury.

It was their defensive signal-caller and captain, Manti Te’o.

In what is appearing to be an extremely freakish beginning to their 2016 campaign, the Bolts have suffered significant season-ending injuries to three of their starters in each of the first three games.

Keenan Allen – ACL tear to his right knee.

Danny Woodhead – ACL tear to his right knee.

Add Manti Te’o to the list, though it was his Achilles’ that gave out, not his ACL.

Even more disconcerting is that each man sustained his injury in a non-contact scenario. We’ll discuss that in another article soon.

Te’o left the game early in the first quarter of the game in Indianapolis with an immediate announcement that he was done for the day. Who was going to be “next man up” this time?

Enter rookie Jatavis Brown, a product from the University of Akron and a fifth-round pick by the Bolts in this year’s NFL draft.

While the former Zips’ linebacker was chosen for a number of reasons, his 4.47-second 40-yard dash was a primary one. His versatility and athleticism only add to his ability. Additionally, per Pro Football Focus (PFF), he was only called twice for penalties (1,629 snaps) over the last two years. PFF also stated that in 2015 when utilized as a blitzer, Brown had 15 sacks, 12 hits, and 22 hurries in 144 pass-rushing snaps. I have to say – just WOW! This from a guy who some considered to be on the small side at 5-foot-11 and 221 pounds. Looks to me like he can hold his own for sure!

Prior to his entering the game on Sunday, the only sighting of Brown was in the preseason game versus San Francisco. He started that game and made five tackles — three of which were solo stops. Since then, he has participated in all three regular season games, racking up 15 tackles (10 solo), four PDs (passes defensed) and collecting a sack and a forced fumble.

His Sunday stats were six tackles with two tackles for loss, defending two passes and adding a sack. His strip-sack of Andrew Luck should be part of a highlight reel, as it was scooped up by the recently signed Caraun Reid and run in for the score.

One of the bright spots of the afternoon in Indianapolis.

So, just who is this guy Jatavis Brown? The answer: he is a player that many scouts, teams and the like knocked due to his size, though his playmaking ability spoke for itself. It was thought that if he couldn’t perform at this level as a linebacker that he could be a hybrid-safety type defender.

In his four years at Akron, he amassed 340 tackles (193 solo), three forced fumbles, two passes defensed and an interception. The 40.5 tackles for loss and 10.5 sacks were not only team-bests but also led the MAC while his total tackles gave him 7th best.

NFL Draft Scout had him ranked #13 out of 203 OLBs. Brown was not only chosen the 2015 Defensive Player of the Year, he was also named to the All-MAC Conference 1st-team three consecutive years.

This is the rookie that after the draft Telesco told Chargers.com writer Ricky Henne, “This is the one guy in our draft room that if we didn’t draft, I think there would have been a revolt amongst everyone else in the room…There are certain guys sometimes that have a trigger for everybody. (Brown) was a guy who everybody wanted on our football team. He’s actually the one guy that (we got) so many different texts from across the league (about) saying ‘Great pick!’ ‘Good pick!’ Those are kind of fun text messages to get during the draft.”

Brown told Henne shortly after the draft, “I do think I’m flying under the radar, but I’ve been flying under the radar my whole life,” he said. “I guess that’s just me. I like to prove people wrong, and that’s how I (operate). I don’t like the spotlight. I’m a laid back, chill guy. So this fits me just fine. I like to do all the dirty work, do what I’m supposed to do and I don’t worry about getting the publicity.”

Well, Jatavis Brown…publicity or no, here is your opportunity to take the bull by the horns and show those detractors just who you are. You had a great start in an unfortunate situation, but it’s always “next man up” in the pros.

Yeah, my money is on this young man to get the job done. I’m looking forward to seeing him blitz Brees and blow up a few plays this Sunday afternoon at Qualcomm.

Thanks for reading and please share your thoughts.

Cheryl White

 

williamsandre

Photo Credit: Chargers.com (Official team website of the San Diego Chargers)

 

Andre Williams wasn’t left out in the cold too long, thankfully. Even better, no one tried to pick him up!

Williams re-joined the Bolts Tuesday. He was waived this past Saturday when the team had to promote tight end Asante Cleveland from the practice squad. The roster moves were necessary because Antonio Gates was not going to see the field against the Colts and there had to be another body out there in addition to Hunter Henry and Sean McGrath.

The third-year back was initially claimed off waivers by the Chargers earlier this month after being released by the New York Giants. That signing occurred after change-of-pace back Branden Oliver was lost for the season after tearing his Achilles’ tendon in the preseason game in Minnesota.

Williams (6-foot, 220 lbs) was a fourth-round pick of the Giants in the 2014 draft. With the Giants having the likes of Rashad Jennings, Shane Vereen, Bobby Rainey and a couple other guys on hand, Williams just didn’t make the final roster cut. This preseason he managed to gain only 91 yards on 25 carries in three games. He was one of 11 running backs on the depth chart in 2015, managing only 257 yards on 88 carries with a lone TD.

Since entering the league, Williams has played in 32 games. He has rushed for 978 yards on 305 carries and scored eight touchdowns — 41 of those carries went for first downs while five were over 20 yards and two were over 40. He also hauled in 19 passes for 137 yards.

Williams is a former Boston College standout. He set a BC school record in 2010 when he made 42 rushing attempts in a single game when the Eagles played Syracuse in that season’s final game. Williams was one of six finalists for the Heisman Trophy in 2013, finishing fourth. That same year he was named the recipient of the Doak Walker Award, an honor given to the nation’s best running back.

Since being in San Diego, Williams hasn’t been in the mix. Things may change this week.

We’ll all just have to play the wait-and-see game.

Thanks for reading!

Cheryl White

@BoltnUp

 

verrett9

 

Entering the 2016 season, Chargers’ cornerback Jason Verrett was primed and ready to begin receiving the national recognition that the former first-round pick has earned via his outstanding play through his first two years.

After a solid 2015 campaign, fans and media members alike could not help but notice No. 22 making countless plays week after week, slowing down or eliminating opposing teams’ No. 1 receiving targets.

In Sunday’s 26-22 loss to the Indianapolis Colts, Verrett did not have one of those games where accolades and praise would come raining down on the young defensive back.

The 25-year-old began Sunday afternoon with the task of being primarily responsible for shutting down wide receiver T.Y. Hilton of the Colts.

It would prove to be a long day for Verrett, as ProFootballFocus.com (PFF) describes his play from the team’s loss on their Top-10 worst performances of the week list.

 

5. Jason Verrett, CB, San Diego Chargers

Verrett came into this game having effectively shut down Jaguars star wide receiver Allen Robinson the previous week, but he couldn’t come close to the same trick against Indianapolis’ T.Y. Hilton, who gashed him for big yardage. In this game Verrett gave up a total of 138 yards and a touchdown, and when targeted, he allowed a perfect passer rating of 158.3.

 

As fans, we are not accustomed to seeing Verrett struggle like this. Hilton is a very talented and speedy wideout, but we have all seen Verrett lock down receivers who are better than the speedster from Indy.

It goes without saying, Verrett knows he performed poorly, and he went on to show just how accountable he felt for the loss, taking to Twitter to voice his thoughts on the game and his performance.

 

 

 

 

Let me follow his tweet by saying that Verrett is clearly not the sole reason the Chargers lost to the Colts; the game was lost by the team as whole, including the, at times, inept coaching staff.

Many fans and teammates had Feeva’s back on the social media website, reassuring him that it was not only his fault and that they knew he would bounce back.

Head coach Mike McCoy stated during a postgame press conference that Verrett was a bit dinged up going into Sunday’s game, mentioning that he was not 100% healthy.

Verrett’s next opportunity comes against the aerial attack of the New Orleans Saints.

Led by quarterback Drew Brees and wide receiver Brandin Cooks, the Saints’ high-powered passing game will prove to be a tough matchup for all of the Chargers’ defense come Week 4.

If Verrett wanted a chance to go out and prove that last week was the exception and not the rule, he has received just that.

I am not expecting Jason to completely shut down Cooks, but I feel confident in saying that he will rise to the occasion and bounce back from Week 3’s performance, proving once again that he is a top-notch cornerback in the NFL.

Over his short career, the third-year veteran defensive back has tallied 73 total tackles, 18 passes defensed and five interceptions — one of which was returned for a touchdown.

 

Thanks a lot for reading.

 

Dave Booga Peters

Rivers-Sad

 

There comes a time when repeated tragedies occur, that you throw up your hands and bellow out a sarcastic laugh or bow your head and give it a good hearty shake.

 

dear-god

 

Week 3 is now in the books and so is the third Charger player to be out for the season due to an injury in as many weeks.

Misery certainly does love company.

After an MRI on Monday, it was officially announced that  Manti Te’o is out for the season with a torn Achilles.  

 

The “Next Man Up” mantra that has been utilized by the Chargers for the past few seasons might need to be changed to “Next Man Down.”

 

Despite the loss of the defensive captain, the Chargers (1-2) also lost another game where they had a chance to win in the end.

Circling around social media last night and Monday morning, there are many that have blamed Philip Rivers, Hunter Henry, Mike McCoy, Melvin Gordon or Josh Lambo for Sunday’s 26-22 loss to the Indianapolis Colts on the road.  

 

Sorry, but I am not going to dignify a response for blaming a kicker whose job is to kick field goals and extra points – not to prevent a rusher from getting a chance to block a kick.  

 

From the early onset of the game, the vibe and tone set by the team was extremely sluggish. The fire and passion that resonated through the first half of Week 1 against Kansas City and the entire Week 2 victory against Jacksonville seemed a distant memory.  

 

slug

 

Rivers was not the elite quarterback that fans have grown accustomed to watching, missing many targets with passes that were too high, too hard or simply off the mark. The fierce competitor that he is, after the game he admitted to the poor performance and execution of his game – even singling out his biggest mistake of the game. “Of all the plays I missed today, I wished I got the one to Travis (Benjamin) on 3rd-and-2 because we were running that thing down.  We may end up with it in our hands at mid-field, and I just missed it…”  

 

Indeed, it was one pass that if completed, the rest of his errant throws would have been forgotten. It was a crucial play that could have possibly secured the game, forcing Indianapolis to use their timeouts and dwindle the game clock down.

Chalk it up to a bad game for the offensive and team leader.

 

One player in particular took the loss solely on himself:

No, Jason, you alone did not lose this game. And might I add that your humility is a breath of fresh air and one of the reasons why you are a fan favorite.

 

It might be true that Jason Verrett was beat often against a very good wide receiver in T.Y. Hilton on Sunday. Equally important to note is that in no way shape or form is the loss all on his shoulders. Game after game the Pro Bowl cornerback has shut down the opposition’s best wideout. It was just a bad day for the talented corner – occurring on a day where others experienced lousy games, as well.

 

Moreover, it was not Feeva’s fault for being on the sidelines during a potential game-clinching 4th-and-7 play with less than two minutes left in the game. Brandon Flowers was covering Hilton and instead of playing him up close, Flowers gave T.Y. a four-yard cushion where he made the easy, wide-open catch at the first down marker, falling forward to ensure the call was a simple one. Flowers has been playing exceptionally better this year than last, and was one of three players that I mentioned on this site to have a great impact this season. It is unfortunate that this crucial play has his named associated with it.

 

Melvin Gordon was held in check by Indianapolis, who came into the game ranked as the worst rushing defense in the NFL. Clearly, the Colts knew about this dubious honor of theirs and studied a lot of film on the second-year starter. It was clear to them that “Flash” loves to run in between the tackles and does not improvise as much as an elite back would. Perhaps it is his style, or perhaps it’s his youth that explains why he runs the way the play is designed to, without recognizing other outlets.

 

Gordon did, however, hit pay dirt again for the fourth time in three games and continues to punish those would-be tacklers. The Chargers fans are very excited about his play thus far. His ability to get into the endzone, his potential, especially if he learns from his mistakes, and how high his ceiling is reinforce the fact that the excitement is justified.  

 

The second-round draft pick of 2016, tight end Hunter Henry, received the starting nod to take the place of the future Hall of Famer Antonio Gates.  Hunter had five catches for 76 yards and looked like he could be the heir apparent of Gates as he levied space between him and the defender, moving the chains on several occasions. Although, it is hard to remember those precise routes and great hands due to his late game fumble that ended any last-ditch efforts for a comeback.  

 

Yes, the Bolts still had a chance to win the game. Yes, the fumble ended that hope. However, it should not have come down to that one play, nor is it the dubious “play that lost the game.”  Hunter is a talented rookie and as you could see his reaction on the sidelines he was devastated.

 

 

hang-head

 

 

As upsetting as it was to watch the game slip away, my heart went out to him and I wondered what encouragement he would receive. Then I saw Gates call him over and give him a veteran pep talk.  

 

By now, most fans who watched the game or have seen the highlights know about all the following miscues: dropped punt, missed catches, missed throws, fumbles…etc.  Let us not take too much time dwelling on those players, because it was not one single player nor single mistake that helped in the loss on Sunday.  It was the collective faux pas of many.

 

McCoy expounded on my thoughts when he stated after the game, “There are a number of plays you look at; missed opportunities through the entire game.  It’s not just one drive or one series.  There were a number of opportunities we had, where we didn’t make the plays today.”

 

To further McCoy’s point, it was not just those mistakes, which during a loss are enhanced and nit-picked, but it was also the penalties. Those yellow flags are thrown often during NFL games, legitimately or otherwise, and this game would see 20 of them – 10 for each team. It has been instilled in many young athletes that a physical mistake is easier to forgive than a mental mistake. Having your named called out by the men in pinstripes is a mental mistake, showing a lack of discipline more often than not. That being said, at least two of those “phantom calls” would cost the Chargers points in the end.  

 

flag

 

Several times those penalties either killed a drive or allowed the Colts to continue theirs. Whether the call is obtuse or astute, it is difficult to gather momentum when the game stops for a penalty.

 

When all’s said and done, with massive blunders and penalties, San Diego still had a chance to win the game. Even with the defense unable to stop the aging wonder who is Frank Gore, collectively they were able to sack Andrew Luck twice, forced two fumbles (recovering one), scored a touchdown and had an interception. Thus far after three games, the defense has logged six total turnovers — four interceptions and two fumbles.  

In 2015, the Chargers secured only 11 interceptions and nine fumbles for the entire season. Furthermore, Rivers has yet to throw an interception, which has contributed to San Diego being at plus-2 in the turnover department, ranking 5th in the AFC.  

 

It was, without a doubt – a sloppy game but one that San Diego should have and could have won. As stated previously, with the poor play at key moments by positional players, and the horrid and massive amount of penalties, the game was still within reach in the waning moments. However, in order to take this team to the next level, a game like this is one that the Chargers needed. A victory would have given then team confidence to win close games and perhaps string a few victories together to gather momentum.  After all, the Bolts have not won back-to-back games since November of 2014.

Let that last sentence sink in for a bit.

The Chargers will return home to Qualcomm Stadium in Week 4 to face the New Orleans Saints. This game will provide the Bolts a prime opportunity to get back on track, possibly evening out their record to 2-2 against a Saints’ team that struggles defensively.

Here is to hoping that the Chargers do NOT lose another key element to their roster for the fourth consecutive regular season week in a row.

 

Please comment below on what miscue, by players or non-players, was the main contributor to the loss in Indy.

 

Thanks for reading.

 

Brian “Big Kahuna” Scott        

 

Te'o

 

In what appears to be an unfortunate yet ongoing theme, the Chargers lost yet another player for the season.

The team announced on its official website on Monday that Manti Te’o suffered a torn Achilles and that he will miss the remainder of the 2016 campaign

The few snaps that Te’o saw Sunday before being hurt may very well have been his last in lightning bolts. The inside linebacker is in the final year of his rookie contract which has yet to be extended.

Te’o exited Sunday’s nail-biter against the Colts with an obvious injury to his lower leg. No contact was made as he was clearly in the middle of the field and suddenly went down, grabbing at his calf. Initial reports shortly after were that it was his Achilles and he would not be returning to the game.

This is the third non-contact injury to a Bolts’ player in as many weeks. First to be lost in the regular season was Keenan Allen, who tore his ACL in the Week 1 game against Kansas City. Last week the team saw all-around back Danny Woodhead go out with an ACL injury, as well. Sunday it was Te’o. This trend brings up many questions but I’m not going to discuss them right now.

What is disconcerting is that this is the third player on the team to be lost for the year due to an Achilles’ tear. First up was tight end Jeff Cumberland, an offseason pickup. He had gone up to catch a deep ball from Kellen Clemens in the Week 2 preseason game against the Arizona Cardinals. The following week it was Branden Oliver. Everyone can recall with utmost clarity when BO’s Achilles’ snapped and rippled up his calf. Now Manti Te’o, the defensive captain and signal caller, has had the same thing happen to him.

Three players lost to an Achilles’ tendon tear in what, six weeks?! Each one coming in a situation where the individual is not being contacted by another player.

The Chargers may not be the only team to have the “injury curse” hit them this early in the 2016 campaign, but it’s damn freaky to have the SAME type of trauma effect three different players in the course of a season.

Let us all hope that this does not continue to be the theme over the course of the remaining games.

Thanks for reading!

Cheryl White

#AchillesWoes

San Diego Chargers' Jatavis Brown (57) in action during the second half of an NFL football game against the Indianapolis Colts, Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

San Diego Chargers’ Jatavis Brown (57) in action during the second half of an NFL football game against the Indianapolis Colts, Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

 

Here we are once again, left to ponder the “what-ifs.” What if this pass was completed? What if this tackle was made? What if this play was called? It is like a broken record for Chargers fans. This was once again the case as the Chargers dropped another heartbreaker to the Colts on Sunday.

After a sluggish offensive start, especially from Philip Rivers — who just looked a bit off all game long — the Bolts fell behind early by a score of 13-6.The Chargers then would tie it up on a fantastic strip sack by Jatavis Brown. The scoop and score afterward by Caraun Reid looked to be the play of the season thus far. The Bolts looked to have stolen the momentum from the Colts going into halftime.

The Chargers would then come out for the second half seeming to shake of the rust of the first half, as they drove the ball down the field lead by some huge catches by Tyrell Williams and Hunter Henry. The drive was then capped off by a 1-yard touchdown run by second-year running back Melvin Gordon. Following the TD, the extra point was blocked by former Charger Antonio Cromartie. On the ensuing drive, the Colts would march right down the field and score, creeping to a one-point disadvantage, 20-19.

As San Diego looked to close the game out, the Rivers-led offense drove the ball down the field in a drive in which Melvin Gordon looked effective, yet the Chargers once again went away from him, throwing it on three consecutive downs. Rivers continued to look just a bit off on two of the three passing plays.

The Bolts just seemed content to kick a field goal and let the defense “Do its job;” by job I mean a big choke job, as Jason Verrett had his worst day in lightning bolts, getting burned by nicked up T.Y. Hilton all game long. The final drive from the Colts would be no different, as Luck would find T.Y. for the game-winning score, as fill-in safety Dexter McCoil and a host of Chargers couldn’t bring him down.

With 1:15 left and two timeouts, the Bolts seemed to have enough time to mount a comeback and steal this one. All hopes of this would soon be dashed away, as a huge completion to Hunter Henry would turn into a fumble with Clayton Geathers punching the ball out and the Colts’ D’Qwell Jackson would recover it, leaving Chargers fans to continue to wonder what if…

Duds of the game:

Philip Rivers – I’m sure he would be the first one to tell you he wasn’t sharp and he left too many points on the field. Notably, early in the game, No. 17 missed a wide open Dexter McCluster for a score. Philip was 26 of 39 for 330 passing yards. Why is he on the Dud list? His misfires were in huge situations where we he has been known to deliver. This loss was atypical for Rivers, seeing as he missed several throws which he would normally complete with ease.

Jason Verrett – I can’t think of a game in which I’ve seen Jason struggle like this. Hilton had his number all day, hauling in eight receptions for 174 yards and the late touchdown to him. Maybe it was just a bad day for Jason. He was definitely exposed against the speed of the Colts’ No. 13.

The Injury Bug – If it wasnt apparent with the loss of Keenan Allen and Danny Woodhead, the injury bug is alive and well in Charger-land, claiming its next victim for the injured-reserve list, Manti Te’o. Te’o wasn’t the only one who was injured, as DJ Fluker, Jason Verrett and Denzel Perryman all looked gimpy by the end of the game on Sunday. Injuries are the nature of the game and tons of teams deal with them, but it seems no team has had to deal with it quite as much as the Bolts have over the past three years. Maybe there really is something in the water, or maybe the McNorv Kool Aid is going bad..

Dishonorable mentions – Chargers’ Run D (making Frank Gore look like ’08 Gore), Chris Hairston, Brandon Flowers

 

Studs of the game:

Jatavis Brown – The 2016 fifth-round selection was thrown into the fire when Te’o went down. Brown made his presence known with his strip of Andrew Luck. He also laid some huge lumber on a number of plays. We didn’t see much of Jatavis in preseason. One thing is for certain: from the limited time we have seen him on the field, Brown seems to have a nose for the ball and is a more capable coverage linebacker then Manti. With No. 50 out for the season, we will see if he can consistently be as disruptive as he was this past Sunday.

Tyrell Williams – Does any wide receiver on this team get more YAC (Yards after the catch) than Williams? He gets the ball and breaks tackles gaining at least 10 more yards afterwards. Add to that he has become one of Philip’s go-to guys on 3rd down, consistently picking them up time after time in the second half. If anyone needs to see the ball more it’s this guy. The emergence of Williams can only mean positive things for this offense going forward.

Melvin Gordon –  Numbers-wise, his performance wasn’t better than last week; in fact, it wasn’t even close, as Gordon had 16 carries for 36 yards, adding one rushing score. Why is he on here then? For the simple fact that he contributed on all phases on offense: rushing, receiving and pass protection. The block he had on Robert Mathis was just unbelievable. Last year’s Melvin would’ve missed that. Melvin still has a long way to go, but thus far this season he’s showed up and then some.

Honorable Mentions – Chargers’ pass rush, Casey Hayward, Travis Benjamin, Denzel Perryman

 

Chris Hoke

@Supercharged17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BoltsRally1024

 

The staff at boltblitz.com give their take on the Chargers week 3 matchup vs the Colts

 

Zak Darman: Chargers come out flat and the Colts come out guns ablazin’. Colts get a 17-10 lead going into halftime with Luck picking apart this defense for 200 first half yards and 2 Touchdowns. Philip gets one before half hooking up with Travis Benjamin. Second half starts and it is the opposite this time with the Chargers leaning on Melvin Gordon and the running game to take a lead late and the defense holds to win it. Chargers 24 Colts 20

 

Chris LaFurno: Last time these teams saw each other, Luck wasn’t hurt. He was good and that Colts team actually went 11-5. Chargers won that game 19-9 not allowing the Colts into the end zone once. Now they face Luck and Co. with a much improved run game and an emerging defense. I believe MG28 will get it going as early as the first drive and the Chargers won’t look back. They’ll open up a 14-0 lead and it will go score for score from there on out. I love Luck. He’s great but just doesn’t have enough help around him for this to be a trap game. Chargers are ready. Phil will go over the 300 yard mark with 3 Touchdowns. MG28 gets two Touchdowns one through the air and one on the ground. Luck will try to test Verrett often and Verrett will answer the call. 6 targets for 2 receptions for 20 yards, 2 PDs and an interception. Defense comes up with 3 turnovers. Chargers win 35-20

 

Laura Leech: Gordon has another strong game with a touchdown. Benjamin with 2. Hunter Henry gets his first. Colts keep it close but an interception seals the deal for the Chargers in a nail biter. 31-24 Chargers

 

Cheryl White: Defense harasses Luck & Co. all day. Verrett blankets Hilton so Luck really can’t get the ball to him. Defense gets at least 2 INT’s, M28 gets two TD’S, Philip surpasses 300 yds this week with 3 TD’S and zero INT’S.. #GoBolts 38-14 Chargers

 

Chris Hoke: The chargers and Indy trade points for most of the game leading to a game winning field goal by Josh Lambo 27-24 bolts

 

Mike Pisciotta: Despite McNorv’s inability to rally the team to play a 60 minute game, Philip Rivers and the offense take advantage of Indy’s depleted secondary to win. Melvin Gordon runs for a buck again and a score, Travis Benjamin hauls in two Rivers’ TD passes and Dexter McCluster runs the first kick off back for a score for the Chargers since 1857. Bolts win 31-17

 

Will McCafferty: I really wanted to predict 41 for the Bolts but I can too easily see McCoy’s sphincter tightening in the fourth quarter once more. He just can’t help himself. The Colts have been getting killed on the ground and no reason to believe that trend shouldn’t continue. Look for Gordon to have another big day….unless he gets pulled in the fourth. The Chargers will dominate the time of preseason, as well as the scoreboard. 31-24 Chargers

 

Greg Williams: The offense keeps rolling and the defense continues to force turnovers and get good pressure on the quarterback. Keep an eye out for Hunter Henry, who will record his first pro touchdown subbing in for an ailing Antonio Gates. 30-14 Chargers

 

Bolt fans, put your prediction down below in the comment section.

 

Thanks for Reading

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