Monthly Archives: June 2016

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Friday morning the Committee for Sports, Entertainment and Tourism delivered 83 boxes containing 110,786 signatures to be filed with San Diego City Clerk Elizabeth Maland.

“On behalf of the entire San Diego Chargers organization, we want to thank every registered San Diego City voter who signed the petition,” said Chargers Chairman Dean Spanos. “We also want to thank representatives of organized labor – and particularly the unions of the Building Trades Council – for their significant help and support during this process. And we are grateful for the volunteer signature gathering work coordinated by the fan groups, including Save Our Bolts and the San Diego Stadium Coalition. The fan groups did a great job, as did the hundreds of other people who contacted us and volunteered to gather signatures.

“Most signature gathering efforts of this kind take six full months. We had just six weeks to complete our work,” Spanos continued. “The fact that we were able to collect more than 110,000 signatures in that short period of time demonstrates tremendous support in our community for a new, combined stadium-convention center expansion downtown.”

The City Clerk and the County Registrar of Voters are now working to verify the signatures that we have submitted. While that verification process continues, the Chargers will continue working behind-the-scenes to win the support of community leaders and elected officials.

CSAG RELAX Meme -- There was No Plan

 

 

Taking the time now to understand why no true stadium plan was ever presented for Mission Valley will help prevent mayor Kevin Faulconer from using false pretenses to not work with the Chargers towards their downtown solution. Faulconer convincingly won re-election in the primary and will be the mayor of San Diego for the next four years. If the Chargers are to stay in San Diego, it’s high likely it will be under his watch.

Faulconer delayed taking a stance on the Chargers initiative for a new stadium downtown before the election with the pretense that he was analyzing the numbers and waiting for a report on the cost to move the MTS bus yard. He also repeatedly claimed that Mission Valley was originally chosen because the costs associated with the that site for a stadium were largely known.

These are red flags that Faulconer could use the bus yard costs as a reason to justify not supporting the Chargers initiative and attempt to pivot back to Mission Valley.

By understanding the costs that were never included in either the Citizen Stadium Advisory Group (CSAG) or the mayor’s plans for a stadium in Mission Valley, we can hold Faulconer accountable and prevent him from misleading us in attempt to further play politics with the stadium issue instead of solving it.

Before unveiling some of the factors that would inflate the costs of a Mission Valley stadium project, let’s be clear, the Chargers are never going to pivot back to Mission Valley. If the Chargers are to stay in San Diego, it will only come with a new stadium downtown.

We know the Chargers are focused solely on downtown because Dean Spanos sent a letter to former councilwoman Donna Frye to assure her that they would never pivot back to Mission Valley. The Chargers have endorsed  Frye’s vision that after the Chargers vacate Mission Valley, the land should be used for a river park and education purposes with an expansion of SDSU and/or UCSD.

“We want to be as clear as we can possibly be about this issue,” Spanos wrote, according to NBC Sports. “We did not choose downtown over Mission Valley casually. Downtown is a plan that can work for the community and our fans. We have tried to make it clear that Mission Valley will not work for the NFL or for the community. The Mayor asked us to make a choice. We made the rational business choice, and the rational choice for the community-at-large. That choice is downtown. Mission Valley is not an option for us, now or in the future.”

The letter assured Frye the Chargers will never opt for stadium in Mission Valley that would partially be paid for with a massive development that would prevent her vision from being realized. This partnership in understanding helps enable supporters of the Citizens Plan backed by Frye and the Chargers initiative to work in tandem despite the initiatives appearing to be in competition. Both sides feel they are in an uphill battle against the City, and have taken the approach that their boats can rise together if they do not allow the media and the City to pit themselves against each other.

A substantial reason the Chargers have no interest in Mission Valley is the cost for a stadium project there would be vastly  more expensive than their downtown proposal. In downtown, construction costs are saved by sharing expenses with a non-contiguous expansion of the Convention Center. In Mission Valley, Faulconer and (CSAG) ignored several known obstacles that would undoubtedly greatly inflate the cost of the overall project.

A few members of CSAG met with stadium advocates days before the group announced they were focused on Mission Valley. Jason Riggs, the Chairman of the San Diego Stadium Coalition, and myself brought a lengthily list of known obstacles to Mission Valley and we campaigned hard for downtown.

Riggs became frustrated that members of CSAG were clearly focused on Mission Valley, but were not able to come up with substantial obstacles for downtown. Riggs then said I have a list of obstacles for Mission Valley right here and challenged CSAG members to provide the obstacles to downtown. There was a pause, a hem and a haw, and then one prominent member of CSAG admitted the real obstacle to downtown was the hoteliers. He even went as far as to define the  hotelier’s political power by the number of rooms their establishments represent.

Our lists of obstacles were politely received and we were told they would be taken under advisement, but neither CSAG nor Faulconer ever addressed them.

CSAG repeatedly justified their decision to choose  Mission Valley  because the City owns the land. Eighty of the 166 acres of the Qualcomm site is actually owned by  city of San Diego’s Water Utilities Department, according to NBC San Diego.

Faulconer has continued to regurgitate the fallacy of the City owning the Mission Valley land in recent interviews. This could be a preview for the foundation for an argument to reject the Chargers initiative after the report on the cost of moving the MTS bus yard is released. The argument would continue to be that the expense of the bus yard would not factor into the stadium if Mission Valley were the site. Therefore downtown is more expensive for taxpayers.

That argument does not hold merit when factoring the fiduciary responsibility that the Water District has to their rate payers to be fairly compensated by the City for their land.

For decades, the city leased the 80 acres for a measly $15,000 a year. The City had been paying rent to Water District until 2005 when the lease ran out. The City then stopped paying and justified withholding of funds by claiming the land had no real value because the stadium was a money losing operation.

“It’s illegal, flat-out illegal,” said City Attorney Jan Goldsmith. “We got to treat the water fund fairly. The water fund is different than tax payers.”

It was also reported that Goldsmith said compensating the water district for past rent and negotiating a future lease with a new appraisal would add millions to any new stadium development in Mission Valley with.

When CSAG released their stadium plan, they recommend selling 75 acres of the Qualcomm Stadium land. CSAG claimed the sale would generate $225 million. There are experts who believe the Mission Valley land is worth nowhere near the valuation CSAG assigned, but within hours Faulconer backed CSAG’s plan giving credence to the valuation for the property.

The acreage CSAG recommended selling is largely owned by the Water District, but there was no plan to compensate them for the land. The Water District was apparently supposed to forgo their fiduciary responsibility to their rate payers so that the funds of the sale could go to the stadium.

In the process, CSAG affectively  told the Water District their previously worthless land was now valued at $240 million.

There is no exact science to determining a fair lease value on the land. When speaking to real-estate professionals, a conservative 5% of return for a long-term contract was suggested.

Just for the sake of argument, let’s assume CSAG’s valuation is accurate and assign an annual fair lease value at 5%. That would equate to a $12 million a year lease. This is on-par with Goldsmith’s estimation that compensating the Water District would add millions to the project.

The Water District is now in position to reasonably argue they are entitled to $132 million in back rent plus interest. They would also need to have been fairly compensated for their land if sold. Much of any sale would have to have gone to the Water District and not the stadium project.

“Perhaps the water fund could retain the water rights under Qualcomm, but then get other compensation by having a land exchange for something else owned by the city,” Goldsmith explained. “But you’d better make sure these appraisals are honest and make sure there’s an arm’s-length transaction. Another option is to buy the 80 acres from the water fund.”

If the Water District maintained ownership of the land, then a fair compensation plan would need to be established for the next 30 years, the time expected to payoff stadium construction bonds. With the same 5% rate of return, and with no inflation on CSAG’s $240 million valuation, then it is fair to argue the Water District should be compensated $360 million over 30 years.

Add in the now 11 years of unpaid rent, the total compensation for the Water District’s share of the land could represent a near a half billion shortfall .

Even if CSAG valuation for the land is not correct, this one obstacles illustrates there was no real plan for Mission Valley.

CSAG and Faulconer also completely ignored known infrastructure needs. Ever since the Chargers turned their focus to downtown in 2009, the pre-existence of needed infrastructure was always touted as a major cost savings for building downtown. In 2012, that saving was estimated at $200 million when the Chargers released art work for a downtown stadium.

Steve Cushman has been particular outspoken against the Chargers plan to build a stadium with a non-contiguous expansion of the Convention Center because Cushman has fought for a contiguous expansion. Cushman acknowledged the cost savings of a downtown stadium after he thought he won a contiguous expansion and suggested the Chargers use the site at Tailgate Park for a stadium in a KPBS interview.

“The advantage of downtown is there is already lots of infrastructure,” Cushman said.  “The Trolley is there. There is lots of parking.”

Councilman Scott Sherman, who has been out spoken against the Chargers downtown vision,  acknowledged the need for infrastructure in Mission Valley in a recent Union Tribune interview where he discussed his vision for development.

“It has to be done right with the infrastructure,” Sherman said. “It just has to be. We’ve got to get the bridge that goes across to Camino Del Rio North down by the stadium, you know, behind IKEA there. That bridge has been proposed and killed several times. And that would just alleviate all kinds of traffic because that road is very underutilized.”

The bridge Sherman referred to is also just one of 16 infrastructure needs that the Chargers made CSAG and the mayor aware of  in a website provided by the Chargers that had previous stadium plans the team had proposed. The infrastructure needs were in the Chargers 2003 plan for Mission Valley.

In 2003, when the Chargers offered to pay for the entire cost of building the stadium in exchange for the Mission Valley land, they also offered to pay for these infrastructure projects after conducting engineering studies. This further validates the need for this infrastructure, because it is unlikely the team would have wanted to pay for any additional infrastructure that what was not required.

Since 2003, there has been a substantial amount of development in Mission Valley without the addition of corresponding infrastructure improvements. With a higher density in Mission Valley today, it is likely the infrastructure needed for a major project has only increased.

None of the 16 known infrastructure needs from 2003 were included in either CSAG’s or the mayor’s plan. Let alone any new infrastructure. It’s possible the infrastructure cost alone needed for a Mission Valley stadium project could in itself exceed the cost of moving the bus yard.

16 known road infrastructure needs of 2003 provided to CSAG:

  1. Friars Road/SR 163 Interchange Roadway & Ramp Improvements including improvements at Friars Road and Frazee Road Intersection
  2. Friars Road/Interstate 15 Exchange, Roadway and Ramp Improvements
  3. Friars Road/Qualcomm Way, Ramps and Intersection Improvements
  4. Texas Street/Camino Del Rio South Intersection Improvements
  5. Camino Del Rio South/Interstate 15 North bound improvements
  6. Friars Road/Mission Center Road, Ramp and Intersection improvements
  7. Rancho San Diego Road/ Ward Road, Intersection Signalization
  8. Friars Road/Mission Center Drive, Interchange Improvements
  9. Interstate 8 Hook Ramps Westbound from Camino Del Rio South to near Interstate 805
  10. Camino Del Rio South to 4 lanes from Fenton Parkway/Mission Center Parkway to Interstate 805
  11. Camino Del Rio North to 4 lanes,  from Fenton Parkway/Mission Center Parkway to Interstate 15
  12. Mission Center Parkway Bridge over Interstate 8, widen to 4 lanes
  13. Bridge over San Diego River at Fenton Parkway
  14. South Development Road Connection offsite, west to Fenton Parkway
  15. Western Development Road Connection, offsite to Northside Drive
  16. Extend Murphy Canyon Road South to development area

The issues surrounding fill dirt were also not addressed. One of the biggest obstacle to construction at Mission Valley is that the entire 166 acre site would have to be brought up to Friars Road level, as illustrated in councilman Sherman’s plan he presented for a stadium.

River View

There are several variables with fill dirt, such as where it is coming from and the quality of dirt, so without knowing those variables ahead of time it is hard to estimate a true cost for a project of this magnitude that would likely take multiple millions of cubic yards (CY) of dirt. Consider one dirt truck only carries 16 CY of fill dirt, it would take 62,500 trucks to deliver each million yards of fill dirt.

The Draft EIR for Mission Valley revealed 920,000 CY of contaminated dirt would be exported from the site and may also entail dewatering. The fuel plume that Kinder Morgan is responsible for the mitigating was only a contributing factor to the contamination. Organo-chlorine pesticide is listed is also listed as a contaminate and is pervasive throughout the site, so it is unclear who would be responsible for cleanup costs.

Draft EIR 920,000 contiminated dirt

To provide an idea of how much 920,000 cubic yards of dirt is, it would equate to 57,500 truck loads, or roughly three truck loads of dirt for every parking spot currently surrounding the stadium.

It also represents the same amount of ruble that is expected to be created by the demolition of Qualcomm Stadium, according to same Draft EIR. The fact the Draft EIR came up with the same number for the cubic yards of dirt that is need to be exported, and the rubble generated by the demolition of the stadium, may validate the concern that the Draft EIR was indeed rushed.

The difference between the Qualcomm Stadium debris and contaminated dirt is the debris would be trucked to the Miramar Landfill, while the soil will likely have to be hauled out of state. The SF Giants ran into this problem when they built their stadium and it cost them over $1 million to export just 18 thousand CY of dirt to Utah.

The mostly likely destination for Qualcomm’s contaminated dirt is Arizona, according to the contractor who discovered the organo-chlorine pesticide in 2005. An Arizona official said they “may” take the dirt.

After the dirt is removed, it would be replaced and then enough additional clean dirt would need to be brought into raise the entire site to Friar’s Road level.

The same company that discovered the contamination, quoted me a drive time of around $110 an hour to export the dirt. Each trip would also need require a disposal fee and labor to load the dirt. They also said that they said they had several hundred thousand CY of certified dirt available for fill. This dirt was nearby Mission Valley and could be brought in for $60 to $70 a truck load.

That, however, may not even replace what needs to be exported. If not enough fill dirt could be found locally for the project, then same high cost of drive time would need to be applied for importing new dirt.

It is important to note that the fill dirt obstacle was discovered after the proposal the Chargers made in 2003 to develop Mission Valley, and may be a huge contributing factor on why the team decided to look elsewhere for their stadium plans.

Parking was also dramatically underfunded, especially in the CSAG plan that proposed a 12,000 space parking structure. This would be the largest in North America, but CSAG only allocated a $144 million in funding.

The Mickey and Friends Parking Structure, a 10,250 space garage at Disneyland, came in ahead of time and under budget in the neighborhood of $240 million in 2001, according to Michael Tomczak, an assistant construction manager on the project.  A 1994 Los Angeles times article supports that claim by estimating the project would cost $223 million.

The 12,000 spaces is also dramatically insufficient. There are currently over 19,000 parking spaces at Qualcomm Stadium. On game days, the parking lot is typically full and the Trolley is extremely busy. The Trolley set a record in 2014 when it carried on average 15,202 passengers to Chargers games.

When factoring in the Trolley, it would take an unattainable four person per car average to accommodate 63,000 fans with only 12,000 parking spaces.

Qualcomm Stadium is a virtual land locked island, so unless there is a significant investment in public transportation, nearly all of the 19,000 spaces would be needed in a new stadium at the location. After speaking to multiple contractors, I learned a fair estimate for a parking structure of that size would be north of $350 million.

These obstacles were brought up again when stadium advocates meet with the team after they announced downtown. They were acknowledged that these and others greatly contributed to the decision to focus on downtown.

None of the estimations made are meant to be set in stone examples. They were not derived from any actual quotes for a job, and estimations can dramatically change based on the contractor. With enough time and money any of these obstacles could likely be overcome.

What is important is these obstacles were either completely overlooked, or dramatically underfunded by both CSAG and the mayor’s plans. With an understanding of the existence of these obstacles, and a rough idea of the costs associated with them, we can hold the mayor accountable.

We must not allow Faulconer to again suggest Mission Valley would be cheaper than downtown in an effort to not embrace the Chargers vision and/or their initiative.

 

Dan McLellan

Melvin+Ingram

 

Is Melvin Ingram ready to take the next step and become a consistent staple of the San Diego Chargers’ defense?

The San Diego Chargers drafted Melvin Ingram with the 18th overall pick in the 2012 draft, despite concerns over his arm length. He has shown flashes of why the Chargers chose the former South Carolina Gamecock.

However, after his rookie campaign where he started two games out of the 16 he appeared in, he missed almost the entire 2013 season with a torn ACL, and again missed time during the 2014 season with a hip injury.

During his four seasons in the NFL, Ingram has amassed 143 tackles, 16.5 sacks and seven forced fumbles, having his best statistical season last year where he recorded 10.5 sacks and 65 tackles, while starting all 16 games.

Last year’s 10.5 sacks placed him tied for 12th among all defensive players in the NFL, however his 65 tackles placed him tied for 121st among all defensive players, and behind teammates Manti Te’o, Eric Weddle and rookie linebacker Denzel Perryman.

His injury history and lack of consistent play, mixed with his exponential boost in play at the midpoint of the 2015 season leaves many confused, and Ingram understands the frustrations.

“I ain’t showed nothing,” he told the San Diego Union-Tribune after last Tuesday’s practice. Also stating, “I have so much to show.”

Ingram has all the tools necessary to succeed. He is strong, quick and agile, he can shed defenders, he is everything you look for in an edge rusher, and over the years his role in the defense has become more defined. But, Ingram is coming into his contract year, and the consensus is that the time is now to live up to his first-round hype, and show consistency, or part ways with the organization.

When asked what he expects from himself this upcoming 2016 season Ingram told the San Diego Union-Tribune, “It ain’t even started.”

“You ain’t even seen what I got going on. When the season starts, everyone is going to see. It’s fixing to get real.”

Ingram seems fully confident coming into the 2016 season, and I believe it will be one for the books. He will continue to build on the successes of his 2015 season, and have the opportunity to pick up where he left off after his first fully healthy season.

Key additions Joey Bosa and Brandon Mebane will help disrupt offenses and cause confusion along the line of scrimmage, providing Ingram with the opportunity to wreak havoc in the backfield. Ingram’s success, along with the encouraging play of the Chargers’ linebackers, should also benefit the secondary.

It’s up to Ingram to prove his worth and take that next step many fans know he’s capable of taking.

I predict he’ll finish the 2016 season with 11.5 sacks and 88 combined tackles.

 

Bill Burgin

 

The San Diego Chargers have completed week two of OTAs and there is plenty of news springing from camp this week. Here’s a look at a few of the stories that are making the rounds in the national media.

Aug 2, 2015; Philadelphia, PA, USA; Philadelphia Eagles offensive tackle Brett Boyko (73) during training camp at NovaCare Complex. Mandatory Credit: Bill Streicher-USA TODAY Sports

Aug 2, 2015; Philadelphia, PA, USA; Philadelphia Eagles offensive tackle Brett Boyko (73) during training camp at NovaCare Complex. Mandatory Credit: Bill Streicher-USA TODAY Sports

From the San Diego Union-Tribune, Michael Gehlken writes about the addition of offensive lineman Brett Boyko. http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/2016/jun/02/chargers-sign-brett-boyko-offensive-line/

Where does Pro Football Focus project the Chargers to finish in 2016? Find out here. https://www.profootballfocus.com/pro-steelers-own-top-spot-in-first-2016-afc-projections/

ESPN Chargers staff writer Eric Williams provides some insight into the mindset of Denzel Perryman as he heads into his second season. http://espn.go.com/blog/san-diego-chargers/post/_/id/16392/denzel-perryman-avoids-bold-predictions-lets-play-do-the-talking

ICYMI: Dan McLellan breaks the news that GOP Chairman admits the GOP opposes Chargers Fan Initiative to build a new stadium. http://boltblitz.com/?p=20966

Finally, a couple from Chargers.com. Site editor Ricky Henne opens his mailbag and answers questions about undrafted rookies, Jatavis Brown, the powder blues and more.  http://www.chargers.com/news/2016/06/02/mailbag-who-hardest-hitting-charger

cavsgsw

With the NBA Finals officially underway, who are your favorite Chargers rooting for? Henne provides the answer here: http://www.chargers.com/news/2016/06/02/cavs-or-warriors-bolts-pick-sides

Stay tuned to BoltBlitz for all the latest news! We will be covering the LT5k on Saturday, June 11. Please come out and lend your time and support to a great cause headed by our favorite son, Ladainian Tomlinson!

On June 12, BoltBlitz is throwing a huge Chargers fans meet-up at the Tilted Kilt in Mission Valley. There will be guest speakers, local TV and radio personalities, raffles of autographed Chargers merchandise and don’t be surprised to see a player or two hanging with you! This will be the biggest Chargers fan weekend of the year to date.

Be there!!!

 

Bolt Up!!

 

The Greg One

 

#SaveOurBolts

 

StuckeyAddae

 

 

Special teams captain. Pro Bowler. Safety. Motivator.

Those are just a few of the terms that one could use to describe the San Diego Chargers jack-of-all-trades Darrell Stuckey.

Stuckey was a nominee for the Walter Payton Man of the Year award last year. The honor was a direct result of his volunteerism not only in San Diego but also in his hometown of Kansas City. In Kansas City he conducts football camps, community projects and works with a non-profit organization called “Not For Sale”. The mission of Not For Sale is to protect people and communities from human trafficking and modern-day slavery.

The 5-foot-11 1/2, 212-pounder has been with San Diego since he was drafted in the fourth round (#110) of the 2010 draft. The former University of Kansas Jayhawk logged 295 career tackles, second-most all time behind Leroy Irvin (the former Rams/Lions defensive back). He also had eight interceptions and eleven tackles for loss in his four-year career there.

At the NFL Combine he clocked the 40-yard dash at 4.49 seconds. He also made a 39.5-inch vertical jump. His height may have been a bit of a concern, but the guy is a ball hawk.

In 73 games, Stuckey has 41 tackles to his name. Besides that, there are five defended passes, two forced fumbles and a sack. He also has five fumble recoveries, of which the best-known came on December 7, 2014 when New England’s wideout Brandon LaFell was hit by Jahleel Addae. Stuckey scooped up the ball and took it 60 yards to the house. It was the longest fumble recovery in Bolts history.

It’s no wonder that his play in the 2014 campaign resulted in his being voted to his first Pro Bowl appearance. His selection was initially as first alternate, however, he ended up joining then teammate Eric Weddle in Hawaii when Patriots player Matthew Slater had to bow out because New England was headed to the Super Bowl.

Those are all wonderful things to be able to be known for long after his football career is over. What seems to give Stuckey the most satisfaction in life is what he does off the field of play.

Being one of the most active Chargers players in the San Diego community is just a small part of who Darrell Stuckey is. He is a participant in the team’s annual “Community Corner” program, which purchases game tickets for charity. Additionally, he is involved with “Athletes for Charity”, a non-profit organization that is dedicated towards improving the lives of disadvantaged and underprivileged youth. In his hometown of Kansas City, he also dedicates his time to the Youth City Network and the KC United Dotte Football Camp.

Let me add just one more charity: Living4One. This organization was founded by Darrell and his wife, Lacie, in 2012. One of the reasons they created it is to assist individuals in recognizing that we each have a purpose in life and it is not solely our day-to-day existence.

To quote Stuckey from the Living4One webpage, their purpose is this: “We must discover our gifts and talents, perfect them, and incorporate them into the master plan. We all have a purpose to fulfill. Our purpose influences the people we are around in our workplace, team, family and community. We must use our gifts to better the world we live in. There is no greater joy than a purpose fulfilled.”

Stuckey is quite obviously a man who leads by example, whether on the field or in the community. His unpretentiousness and willingness to provide support for others in some of life’s most unfair and desperate times is refreshing.

Darrell Stuckey would certainly have my vote if fans could somehow publicly recognize his efforts once his playing days are over.

Take a bow, sir. You are a bright light in a sometimes unfair and discouraging world and I thank you for your selflessness.

Thanks for reading.

Cheryl White

#humble

BoltBlitz-800x450-e1412795490245

 

Community Partner:

On behalf of Strikes For Kids, I would like to cordially invite you to the Second Annual Kaiser Permanente Strikes For Kids San Diego Bowling Classic. The fundraiser for all ages and skill levels will be hosted by Chargers’ Pro Bowl specialist Darrell Stuckey & Safety Jaheel Addae. The event will take place on October 3, 2016 at Poway Bowl from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm.

Proceeds from the event goes to benefiting The Strikes For Kids Scholarship Program which will award four (4) $500 scholarships to the The San Diego Foundation. The San Diego Foundation strives to improve San Diegans’ quality of life by creating equity and ensuring opportunities to be WELL (Work, Enjoy, Live & Learn). Established in 1975, they now manage more than 1,900 funds, which have raised in excess of $900 million to support nonprofit organizations that do good throughout our community.

Strikes For Kids is a 501 c3 nonprofit organization that was launched in 2012 that partners more than a 125 NFL players with benefiting youth organizations in communities across the United States.  We coordinate charity bowling, softball and golf events that allows fans, families and local businesses an opportunity to come together for a fun-filled  event to support a positive cause in their city while enjoying the chance to meet their favorite athletes.

Helping us giving back to the community does so much to help those in need and contribute to the common good. You can give back in different ways, by  participating in the event, donating to it or just by simply volunteering your time. No matter how you do it, giving back to the community will touch many people’s lives. Even the smallest good deed can ignite change and positively impact the community by providing a renewed sense of hope. ​Once again thank you for your help and support I look forward to seeing you on the lanes!

Sincerely,

Joe Allen
Founder/Strikes For Kids
(559)241-4412
jallen@strikes4kids.org

 

 
 Registration options:
Spectator- $20 (gift bag, raffle and silent auction)
Bowler- $35 (two hours of bowling, shoes, event shirt, pizza per lane, pitcher of soda, gift bag, raffle and silent auction)
Lane (up to) 6 bowlers- $175 (
two hours of bowling, shoes, event shirt, pizza per lane, pitcher of soda, gift bag, raffle and silent auction)
 

 
Schedule of events:
6:00 pm to 6:30 pm- Registration/Check-in
6:30 pm to 8:30 pm- Bowling
7:00 pm to 8:00 pm- Silent auction
8:30 pm to 8:45 pm-  Awards ceremony/closing remarks
 

 
Location:
Poway Fun Bowl is a family-owned bowling center located in the heart of Poway, California. Our facility has 32 bowling lanes, an arcade, 7 pool tables and a sports lounge with 10 TVs  and a dance floor. Our friendly and considerate staff will make you feel like you’re family and our welcoming atmosphere will allow you to relax and enjoy yourself with ease. – See more at: http://www.powayfunbowl.com/#sthash.w1E8Wdl2.dpuf

lt5k_jpg

 

For the third year in a row, BoltBlitz.com will be covering the LT5K. We are very excited to once again be a part of such an awesome event hosted by one of the greatest Chargers of all-time, LaDainian Tomlinson.

Below are the details from www.lt5k.com:

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!!!

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Integrated Sports Marketing is proud to announce that back, for the 4th year in a row is the, 2016 LaDainian Tomlinson 5K/1-Mile Kids Fun Run presented by EDCO.

Coming to San Diego June 11, 2016, the event will once again take place at NTC Park at Liberty Station. Formerly a Naval Training Center, NTC Park has one of the most prominent park views in San Diego. With its 46-acre water access NTC Park at Liberty Station is the premier location to host the LT 5k. This will be a fun, family-friendly event for all ages, including a kids fun zone, music, and exhibitor area. This is a great way to have fun and support a great cause!

Your paid registration includes:

  • 5k Fun Run or Kids 1-mile Run in beautiful Point Loma
  • Digital Chip Timing
  • Performance Event T-shirt
  • Commemorative Finisher Medals for all participants
  • Free snacks and drinks
  • Autograph booth for participants featuring LaDainian Tomlinson and other celebrities (must have race bib to get autographs)
  • Kids Fun Zone with bounce houses from LB Jumpers Express
  • Music/DJ
  • Awards for overall and age group winners

Charitable proceeds benefit the Tomlinson’s Touching Lives Foundation: a nonprofit charity that engages in a number of programs designed to promote educational, social and cultural awareness and positive self-esteem to enhance the lives of children, families and communities.

As you can see from the aforementioned material, this is a great opportunity for the fans to come out and have an awesome time while supporting a great cause.

Just to reiterate the information above, this is a family-friendly event, so bring the kids and come out for a great day at NTC Park at Liberty Station.

Booga Peters

To realize the goal of keeping the Chargers in San Diego with a new stadium, it will take more than getting the team’s initiative on the ballot and passing it in November. Voters must also remove politicians that are likely to work against the Chargers’ downtown vision. District 7 city councilman Scott Sherman is near the top of the list of politicians that are not just stadium obstructionists, but are just plain bad for San Diego.

Sherman was interviewed by the San Diego Union-Tribune and made it is clear he is against the Chargers’ plans for a multi-use stadium downtown that would include a non-contiguous expansion of convention center, and he is largely in favor for big development in Mission Valley.

Sherman attacked both the Citizens Plan, written by attorney Cory Briggs, and the Chargers’ initiative. Either of which would entitle the land for a downtown stadium.

“Well, the Briggs initiative is just terrible and I don’t think should see the light of day. I don’t know why San Diegans would trust a guy who makes his living suing the taxpayer. Plus you’ve got the Port, who came out on that one the other day. The Chargers’ plan I don’t think will work. I think they picked a tough way to get there. The Convadium idea, to me, is the biggest problem because we did some research in my office about Lucas Oil field. That thing is terrible.”

Last year, Sherman rolled out plans for a high-density development for the Mission Valley stadium land and presented them to the Citizens Stadium Advisory Group (CSAG) with hopes his plan would be incorporated into CSAG’s stadium plan for Mission Valley.

River View

 

 

It is clear Sherman would like to move forward with his development plan. “I think they’re coming now because the community plan update is in progress,” Sherman said in regards to huge development in Mission Valley.  “So I think a lot of them are wanting to try to get this done before that could change what’s coming. There’s a lot planned for the Valley.”

Sherman even questioned the Chargers’ effort to stay in San Diego, questioning whether or not they were even sincere. “The cynical part of me says, OK, they’re doing all of this, they don’t have to pay rent for a couple of years in the Rose Bowl, they get free playing here at Qualcomm, and when everything’s done they go out there and say we tried, don’t hold it against us, we’re on our way.”

Sherman claims he wants the NFL in San Diego, but the Chargers to Los Angeles appears to be his real goal. Jason Riggs, the Chairman of the San Diego Stadium Coalition, and myself met with Sherman after he released his plans for Mission Valley. It was a deeply frustrating experience. Sherman admitted that CSAG was facing difficulties in Mission Valley, but brought up several false barriers for a downtown stadium.

The meeting concluded with Sherman stating his plan wasn’t a stadium plan, but a development plan and it was going happen.

If Sherman doesn’t want the Chargers in downtown and wants a big development in Mission Valley, then what he really wants is the Chargers out of his way to accomplish the goals he has for his developer friends.

Fortunately, San Diego has a better choice. Justin DeCesare is running against Sherman in District 7. DeCesare is supportive of the Chargers moving downtown and has a much better vision for the future of Mission Valley.

“I’ve always thought that if a new stadium is to be built, downtown would be a far better location in order to protect the environmental concerns of the San Diego River and minimize the traffic impacts on the already overburdened residents of Mission Valley,” DeCesare said. “Once elected, one of my top priorities for the residents of District 7 will be protecting the Qualcomm site from condo development, and instead turning it into a major public park that can be enjoyed by all San Diegans while protecting SDSU’s football program.”

DeCesare not only is a viable candidate who has an excellent shot of ousting Sherman, DeCesare could outright win the District 7 seat with enough support in the primary on June 7. If any city candidate reaches 50% +1 of the vote in the primary, then they win without having to run in the general election. As of June 1, early ballot returns show DeCesare could have a greater than 4% lead based on a partisan ballot count.

DeCesare still needs help to ensure victory. His campaign is holding daily get-out-to-vote events from now through election day and needs volunteers. 

To volunteer, email the campaign: campaign@justin2016.com.

Voting Guide

 

Dan McLellan

henry2

 

The Chargers have signed tight end Hunter Henry to a four-year contract on Thursday, according to ProFootballTalk.com.

Financial details of the deal have yet to be released.

The team’s 2016 second-round draft selection was the John Mackey Award winner in 2015 while at Arkansas. Almost as impressive as his award was the fact that Henry did not drop one pass during the 2015 collegiate season.

The former Razorback was widely regarded as college football’s best tight end coming into the 2016 draft by the majority of draft pundits.

With the recently departed Ladarius Green signing with the Pittsburgh Steelers this offseason, Henry will be called upon to contribute immediately.

Reports out of Chargers’ OTAs have made it seem as thought he has already impressed. I’m sure it doesn’t hurt that he has future Hall-of-Famer Antonio Gates in camp to learn from.

Now that Henry has signed, the Bolts only have Joey Bosa and Max Tuerk left to sign to their respective rookie contracts.

 

Booga Peters

GordonWatt2

 

The San Diego Chargers’ coaching staff is hard at work coaching and evaluating their players in the classroom and on the field during OTAs. They have a very interesting camp battle going on in the fullback department. Though the competition is a two-man race, it’s going to be one of the most compelling to watch.

The Chargers drafted Wisconsin fullback Derek Watt (pictured above) with the second of their two sixth-round picks in the 2016 NFL Draft. The man he is hoisting in the air is the running back the Bolts tabbed to be their new franchise running back, Melvin Gordon. The Chargers traded up to select Gordon with their first-round pick in the 2015 NFL Draft. Watt was the lead fullback for Gordon during his three seasons at Wisconsin. Gordon broke NCAA rushing records and finished as a Heisman Trophy finalist in his last season at Wisconsin.

Standing at 6-foot-2 and weighing 236 pounds, Watt is the favorite to win the job because the Chargers did use a draft pick on him and for his already established chemistry with Gordon. Watt is the younger brother of Texans’ superstar and 2014 NFL Defensive Player of the Year J.J. Watt. Derek has a great template on how to be a great pro from one of the best players in the game today.

cswain1

No player is guaranteed a roster spot and in this case it is no different. The Chargers signed Chris Swain of Navy as an undrafted free agent. Last week, the Department of Defense granted a deferral of his military service in order for him to play for the Chargers. With San Diego being the United States epicenter for the Navy, Swain is a fantastic success story. Swain will be an automatic fan favorite, one every fan will want to see make the cut.

Standing 6-foot and weighing 247 pounds, Swain ran for 1,023 yards and 10 touchdowns as a senior. Taking into account his stout frame, he’s the proverbial bowling ball rolling downhill. He was the perfect complement to Navy’s high-flying, triple-option offense. A perceived weakness could be his pass-catching skills, as he only caught two passes in his career at Navy. His running style and pass blocking have drawn criticism but those are all things a good coach can develop.

What works to the advantage of both players is the offense of new offensive coordinator Ken Whisenhunt. Last season under Frank Reich, the Bolts ran 12 plays from a two-back formation. Reich was unwilling to adapt his “pistol-centric” offense to Gordon and the running game suffered. In Whisenhunt’s lone year as offensive coordinator in 2013, he ran 115 plays out of a two-back formation. The last time the Chargers made the playoffs? 2013. Whisenhunt parlayed that success into a head coaching position with the Tennessee Titans after that one season.

It is expected that Whisenhunt will be running more conventional two-back formations, so both fullbacks will get ample opportunities to succeed and make the roster.

My expectation is Watt will be the win the starting gig and Swain will be placed on the practice squad. We as Chargers fans know how often injuries happen. The practice squad is not a black hole, it’s an on-deck circle.

Good luck to both young men, and salute to you, Mr. Swain. You defend our Country so we can live out our dreams. Here’s to you getting to live out your dreams.

 

Bolt Up!!

 

The Greg One

 

#Fullbackfanclub

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