Booga Peters

Booga Peters

AlbertoRiveron1

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: I love me some Alberto Riveron, so I couldn’t be happier to have seen his recent promotion in the press release posted below.

(Sorry, Dean Blandino. I have this weird thing — not good-weird, but bad-weird — for guys named Dean, and you were no Mike Pereira, either.)

 

NFL ANNOUNCES NEW OFFICIATING LEADERSHIP TEAM

Alberto Riveron, a member of the NFL’s Officiating Department since 2013 and a nine-year veteran NFL game official has been named NFL senior vice president of officiating.

Riveron will oversee all aspects of the league’s officiating department – including the implementation of the centralized replay model approved by clubs at the annual meeting in March – as well as administration, evaluation and development.

A native of Cuba, Riveron moved to Miami at age five with his family and developed a passion for the game.  He began as an official in local youth leagues in 1977, made his collegiate officiating debut in 1990 before joining the NFL officiating ranks in 2004.  In 2008, Riveron was promoted to referee, earning the distinction as the NFL’s first Hispanic referee.  Riveron came off the field following the 2012 season to join the league office as senior director of officiating.

“Al has done a terrific job as a key member of our officiating staff for the past four seasons,” said NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.  “Prior to that, Al was an outstanding on-field official who earned the respect of his fellow officials, as well as coaches and players alike.  To have Al leading our officiating department, and then to add talented, knowledgeable instant replay and officiating experts like Russell and Wayne, is a tremendous positive for us as we look forward to the 2017 season.”

Reporting to Riveron, who will report to NFL Executive Vice President of Football Operations Troy Vincent, will be two new hires designed to aid in the department’s long-standing goal of excellence in officiating performance –Russell Yurk and Wayne Mackie.

Yurk joins the staff as Vice President of Instant Replay and Administration.  In this role, Yurk will direct the league’s instant replay operations in the Art McNally GameDay Central room and oversee all instant replay-related personnel.  Yurk will also be responsible for officiating administration, including supervising operational aspects of scheduling and logistics as well as the training and development of instant replay personnel.

Yurk spent the past seven seasons as an NFL instant replay official after working as an on-field official for 10 seasons at the high school and college level. An instant replay expert, Yurk assisted in authoring the replay section of the NFL Referee’s Manual for the past two years.

Mackie, a 10-year veteran NFL game official, has been named Vice President of Officiating Evaluation and Development, responsible for the officiating evaluation and development program, managing the on-field officials weekly crew evaluation process, as well the staff of officiating supervisors and trainers, and the management of the Officiating Development Program.

A highly-respected on-field game official for the past two decades at the collegiate and professional level, Mackie entered the NFL in 2007 as a head linesman and quickly established himself as one of the league’s top officials at his position.  Mackie has officiated in eight NFL playoff games, including serving as head linesman at Super Bowl 50 and for two conference championship games during his 10-year NFL career.

Mackie began his collegiate officiating career in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference in 1996 and also officiated in the Atlantic 10 and Big East through his final collegiate season in 2006 prior to joining the NFL.

Riveron, Yurk and Mackie will all work in GameDay Central throughout the season and have the final say on instant replay decisions, in consultation with the referee as part of the new replay rules for the 2017 season.

“Al, Russell and Wayne are a team dedicated to delivering the highest quality of officiating and game administration in professional sports,” Vincent said.  “The structure of their responsibilities will provide us with a sustainable model for greater efficiency, improved performance from our officials, and operational excellence in collaboration, development and training of our officiating team.”

 

boston2

 

The Los Angeles Chargers had free-agent safety Tre Boston pay them a visit. The former Carolina Panthers defensive back has also visited with the Buffalo Bills.

Boston has familiarity with Bills new head coach Sean McDermott and new general manager Brandon Beane from his time in Carolina.

Boston took to Twitter to keep everyone posted on where he is at in the free-agent process and how he felt about the two clubs that hosted him.

 

 

 

 

As noted by Eric Williams of ESPN.com in a recent article, “…the Los Angeles Chargers did not address the safety position until Day 3, selecting Miami’s Rayshawn Jenkins in the fourth round and Iowa’s Desmond King in the fifth,” which gives the Bolts every reason to bring in Boston and attempt to sign him to Gus Bradley’s defense.

As it stands right now, the Bolts are slated to start Jahleel Addae and Dwight Lowery at the strong-safety and free-safety spots, respectively. They also have safeties Dexter McCoil, Darrell Stuckey, Adrian Phillips and Adrian McDonald on the roster.

Although the number of bodies at the position seems sufficient, it is lacking the quality depth you need at this level, especially in a pass-happy league where signal callers often are slinging the rock 30-plus times a game.

As mentioned above, the Chargers did select Jenkins from “The U” and project him to eventually be an in-the-box safety, his time to make an impact is not necessarily this year. King looks to be penciled in as No. 1 on the depth chart at nickel-corner, by my estimation when looking at the roster.

Adding Boston would indeed give the Chargers some much-needed depth and perhaps another playmaker in a secondary boasting the likes of Casey Hayward and Jason Verrett.

Drafted out of UNC in the fourth round of the 2014 Draft by the Panthers, the 24-year-old has amassed 108 total tackles, two sacks, 10 passes defensed and three interceptions — one of which he returned 84 yards for a touchdown as a rookie — in his three seasons in the NFL.

 

Booga Peters

 

 

 

LA

 

On Monday, I posted an article regarding my thoughts on how utterly stupid the whole “#FightForLA” stance is for the Los Angeles Chargers.

I shared the article per my normal posting guidelines — all over social media.

One of my favorite writers on any site ever — who is now a FORMER writer of mine due to the team’s relocation to Los Angeles — read the article and then posted the following response.

Before you read it, I told him how much I felt his emotions along with him as I read his comment. It is raw, real and unedited, and he even apologized at the end for his post being, “so long.”

He had NO reason to apologize, which I also pointed out.

You may be able to sense what I’m getting at when you continue to read.

 

 

I was re-considering my decision during the draft on whether or not to be a Chargers fan. I have checked up on them and saw they had a great draft. I started reading about their picks, I unblocked them on Twitter and started looking through their old tweets that I have missed because they were blocked.

 

As I was reading, I was starting to get excited again. I was getting excited for the season, getting excited to watch my favorite team play football again. Then as I was reading some articles and tweets a little hashtag caught my eye. That hashtag happened to be #FightForLA. Seeing that made my heart drop again. As if looking at your newly broken up relationship and seeing her engaged two months after a 24 year relationship. I simply can’t root for a team that is all about LA and has no intention on remembering their true home, San Diego.

 

Now, I wish you guys all the best. I will probably just end up being a fan of players, fantasy players, the game, etc. as I recuperate from my city no longer being an NFL one. It sucks, but hopefully one day we will get our team back. Hopefully one day the league realizes what a mistake it was leaving a loyal city whether it looked like it or not. Hopefully one day I can look at the Chargers and think to myself “I wish they would win a Super Bowl” because right now, it still hurts and it’s nothing but bad wishes and resentfulness.

 

This young man’s name is Zakariah Darman — it’s Zak, by the way, but whatever — playfully known as ZDizzle around these here parts.

His highly placed love for the Chargers was only trumped by his love for his city; the finest city in all of America, San Diego.

You almost sucked him back in, Chargers… but you found a way to fuck it up with your ignorant “#FightForLA” bullshit.

EDITOR’S NOTE: A big shoutout to Zak for allowing me to use this on the website that he used to bless with his knowledge, charisma and incredibly good looks. You are still missed, Sir.

 

Booga Peters

draft

 

Los Angeles Chargers cornerback Jason Verrett knows a thing or two about quality defensive-back play.

Some may say that his knowledge of solid secondary play is only trumped by that of his familiarity of being injured and knowing his way around the trainer’s room.

Though No. 22 has missed more than his fair share of games, there is no doubt that he is a stud when healthy and on the field, flashing glimpses of greatness often.

After going wide receiver in the first round (Mike Williams), then offensive line in the second and third rounds (Forrest Lamp and Dan Feeney, respectively), the Bolts switched their focus from the offensive side of the ball to the defensive unit of the club.

General manager Tom Telesco addressed the defensive backfield in the fourth and fifth rounds, selecting Rayshawn Jenkins of the University of Miami and Desmond King of the University of Iowa, respectively.

 

“It was great for us to get them,” Verrett told Hayley Elwood of the team’s official website.  “When we drafted Rayshawn Jenkins from Miami, I texted Denzel (Perryman) quick and asked what he thought about him.  Denzel said he was a dog, so it was nice to get that addition there and add more depth.  With Desmond King from Iowa, I actually knew of him because he won the Jim Thorpe Award in 2015.  I thought that was a great pick as a guy who can come in and help us out in that nickel position.”

 

The fourth-year defensive back seemed to be looking forward to talking with both of his rookie peers, adding “I want to be able to pick their brains to see their strengths and weaknesses, and what they can do out on the field to help us.  If we can get some ball hawks in the slot and nickel positions along with Casey (Hayward) and me on the outside, we could be dominant.”

The initial feeling around the NFL is that King has the potential to be the steal of the ’17 Draft, while Jenkins looks to have been chosen to play as an in-the-box safety for Gus Bradley’s defense, fitting into that Kam Chancellor-like role. Both players have impressive traits in defending both the passing and running games, but they are sure to be tested once stepping foot onto an NFL (Soccer) field.

I must say, the Chargers’ secondary is shaping up to be something special heading into this year, but it all boils down to staying healthy.

Well, shit.

 

Thanks a lot for reading.

 

Booga Peters

 

 

 

 

5-2-Junior-Seau-2

 

 

It snuck up on me this year; the day we all lost our buddy, Tiaina Baul “Junior” Seau Jr.

Seau passed away on this day in 2012.

I will never forget that day and how terrible it was to hear the news of the passing of the legend Junior Seau. I honestly don’t know if I had ever cried that much in my entire life.

I was going to try to write something here, but I am unable to do so at this time.

Instead, I am just going to post some pictures and highlights of the best linebacker to EVER play the game of football.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seau20

 

Seau22

 

 

Just in case you weren’t crying yet, here’s an awesome Junior Seau Tribute Song:

 

 

 

I have been fortunate enough to meet both Mary and Savaii through work on the website, Buddy. Great people, Sir.

 

 

BoogaMarySeau

 

 

BoogaVii1

 

 

 

You are dearly missed, Buddy. You meant so much to all of San Diego, Oceanside and many other areas all over California, the U.S.A. and the world.

R.I.P. Junior

 

P.S. My eight-year-old daughter, Mekyah, has a 20-year-old best friend in the form of a beat-up, aging but vibrant cat. His name is Seau. Your name is spoken by myself and my family every single day, just as it has been since watching you crush opposing players during your days at USC.

 

Bosa13

After posting 10.5 sacks and 15 quarterback hits during a 12-game rookie year, Los Angeles Chargers defensive Joey Bosa earned the Defensive Rookie of the Year Award for his stellar performance.

The third overall selection in the 2016 Draft out of Ohio State missed the first four games of last season due to a contract dispute and a hamstring injury.

Knowing that he missed four games makes his rookie output even more impressive.

On Monday, Bosa received the honor of being named to the NFL Top 100 Players of 2017, an award that is voted on by NFL players.

Though the 21-year-old still has a lot to learn about the NFL, it goes without saying that he has an incredibly bright future in the league.

After notching four total sacks in his first three games played, No. 99 had a three-game “sackless” streak before finishing the year with at least one sack in five of his last six contests. (At least he wasn’t “physically/personally sacless,” so to speak. I’ll show myself out. Tip your servers and bartenders.)

The 6-foot-5, 280-pound Florida native will be given every opportunity to surpass his impressive rookie stats now that the team has called upon Gus Bradley to take over the defensive coordinator position after John Pagano was not retained during this offseason.

The defensive stand-out should only get better in Bradley’s system, while also giving fans his celebrated “#ShrugLife” pose after wreaking havoc on the opposing team’s quarterbacks while setting up shop in their backfields.

 

Thanks a lot for reading.

 

Booga Peters

 

 

 

LightningBolt

 

Now that the NFL Draft has concluded, you will begin to see folks like me stretching out the content a bit; perhaps even posting some (more) nonsense that will have you trying to figure out what the hell I was thinking when I thought that was a good idea.

Alas, he we are and you’re reading this right now.

Of the 15 undrafted free-agent rookies signed by the Los Angeles Chargers, one name sticks out among the others: Younghoe Koo.

Is that not an absolutely awesome name?

The former Georgia Southern kicker recently posted a video of an incredible field-goal attempt on his Twitter account, and you need to watch it to believe it.

 

 

 

 

The 22-year-old Koo, a Lou Groza Award Finalist and All-Sun Belt First-Team kicker as a senior, made 19 of his 20 field-goal attempts in his final year of college, tying a school record. He has a career-long of 53 yards as he enters the offseason program with the Bolts.

I can tell you right now that I am rooting for this guy, and I hope he gives incumbent Josh Lambo a run for his money during training camp and OTAs.

If he makes the 53-man roster, I am definitely going to have to purchase his jersey.

 

Booga Peters

AFCWEST2

 

Chad Reuter of NFL.com has taken on the task of grading each and every one of the NFL’s 32 draft classes in this year’s draft.

Clearly, the conjecture involved here is what it is, but I really like Reuter and his work for NFL.com.

For the sake of this article, we’ll begin with his thoughts on the AFC West.

 

DENVER BRONCOS:

Garett Bolles (No. 20 overall), DeMarcus Walker (No. 51 overall), Carlos Henderson (No. 82 overall), Brendan Langley (No. 101 overall), Jake Butt (No. 145 overall), Isaiah McKenzie (No. 172 overall), De’Angelo Henderson (No. 203 overall), Chad Kelly (No. 253 overall)

Reuter’s Take:

Day 1 grade: C
Day 2 grade: A-
Day 3 grade: B+
Overall grade: B
The skinny: Garett Bolles is an athletic, tough-minded player. He’s also an older prospect who has lived through a lot. Some teams have concerns about his ability to handle complex line adjustments. The team certainly needed a left tackle, but Ryan Ramczyk was also available here. It will be interesting to compare the careers of those two players. Though DeMarcus Walker didn’t get a lot of love after his big first week in 2016, his power and hustle make him a great pass rusher. They got a good receiver in Carlos Henderson in the third round, one of the toughest pass-catchers to tackle in the draft. Bolstering the team’s cornerback depth was a major need, so picking up intriguing former FBS cornerback Brendan Langley was worthwhile.

Denver ended the draft with a bang — taking Chad Kelly at Mr. Irrelevant. Kelly’s potential makes him a non-irrelevant selection. There’s no reason not to make that pick given his arm strength and football acumen — if he can calm himself and focus on the task at hand. The Broncos‘ first pick of Day 3 was the top selection in the fifth round, tight end Jake Butt. He should be a solid starter when he recovers from his bowl game injury. They picked up an extra fifth from Cleveland in an earlier deal. Late-round running backs De’Angelo Henderson and Matt Dayes will make an impression in training camp.

 

My take on Bolles, Butt and Kelly:

 

ChadKelly

I am not a fan of the fact that I like the Broncos’ draft class this year. Addressing the offensive line — adding Bolles — in the first was a must, and the team added one of my favorite prospects in the entire class in Michigan tight end Jake Butt.

The thing that sticks out to me the most is John Elway pulling the trigger on troubled quarterback Chad Kelly of Ole Miss.

Kelly, nephew of former NFL gunslinger Jim Kelly, was selected by Elway with the last pick of the draft (No. 253). The youngster has all of the makings on the field of a solid early-round prospect  — injuries aside — but his inability to stay out of trouble off of the field resulted in his fall to the Mr. Irrelevant selection.

 

KANSAS CITY CHIEFS:

Patrick Mahomes (No. 10 overall), Tanoh Kpassagnon (No. 59 overall), Kareem Hunt (No. 86 overall), Jehu Chesson (No. 139 overall), Ukeme Eligwe (No. 183 overall), Leon McQuay (No. 217 overall)

Reuter’s take:

Day 1 grade: B+
Day 2 grade: A
Day 3 grade: C
Overall grade: B+
The skinny: Chiefs GM John Dorsey and head coach Andy Reid saw Brett Favre in Green Bay, and they have to see some of that gunslinger attitude in Mahomes. There is a risk factor here given his penchant for throwing the ball anywhere and from any arm angle (which will turn into interceptions in the NFL), and they have up a future first-round pick to get him. But if anyone can get Mahomes to adjust and succeed, it’s Reid. Villanova doesn’t put out a lot of top football players, but the Philadelphia crowd love seeing Tanoh Kpassagnon get picked. He’s a very good five-technique with a lot of upside. The Chiefs got a starter in Kareem Hunt, an all-around player who can do it all. Patrick Mahomes has all of the tools to be a great quarterback.

The Chiefs continued to move up and down the board on Day 3. Jehu Chesson was inconsistent in his senior year, so I might have waited a bit to pick him given the other receivers available. They also gave up a fifth-round pick to pick him, which isn’t a premium selection, but would have helped with depth. Kansas City didn’t select a cornerback with some size, which would have helped this season.

 

My take on Mahomes:

 

Mahomes

Though I like this class as a whole, it begins and ends with the drafting of Mahomes.

The Texas Tech star seems primed to replace current quarterback Alex Smith sooner rather than later, as the latter is hardly an average signal caller at this point in his career.

Mahomes has as good of a chance to succeed in the NFL as any of his peers at the position from this class, possessing an awkward, yet highly accurate deep ball. Though he often throws off of his back foot and from odd trajectories, he still manages to give his receiving weapons great opportunities to come down with the rock. The only team in the AFC West that I was hoping to land the former Red Raider will be playing its home games at the StubHub Center in ’17.

 

OAKLAND RAIDERS:

Gareon Conley (No. 24 overall), Obi Melifonwu (No. 56 overall), Eddie Vanderdoes (No. 88 overall), David Sharpe (No. 129 overall), Marquel Lee (No. 167 overall), Shalom Luani (No. 221 overall), Jylan Ware (No. 231 overall), Elijah Hood (No. 242 overall), Treyvon Hester (No. 244 overall)

Reuter’s take:

Day 1 grade: B+
Day 2 grade: B+
Day 3 grade: B+
Overall grade: B+
The skinny: As long as Conley’s off-field issues are cleared up, the Raiders got the long, agile, ballhawk they needed. If he gets in trouble, then GM Reggie McKenzie will have to answer for the pick. The Raiders are in love with long, athletic secondary members. Obi Melifonwu is a hard-hitting guy with nice speed that Al Davis would have loved. If Oakland gets the junior-year Eddie Vanderdoes, they’ll like his interior push; if he’s the 2016 Vanderdoes, they might not like what they see.

Oakland needed to get better on the offensive line, but David Sharpe must prove he can move with NFL-caliber players on a down-by-down basis. If he can, his length and size make him tough to get around. They met their inside linebacker need with Marquel Lee from Wake Forest in Round 5. Oakland didn’t ignore the running back position despite signing Beast Mode — Elijah Hood is a banger, as well.

 

My take on general manager Reggie McKenzie:

 

ReggieMcKenzie1

You sexy mutha.

This dude seems to have turned around what was a horrid franchise when he took over the organization’s general-manager spot.

After effective drafts and free-agency periods the last few seasons, the Raiders are primed to push toward the top of the AFC for the next several years, as they finished last season as the fifth seed and a 12-4 record.

Look out for the Silver and Black, folks.

 

 

LOS ANGELES CHARGERS:

Mike Williams (No. 7 overall), Forrest Lamp (No. 38 overall), Dan Feeney (No. 71 overall), Rayshawn Jenkins (No. 113 overall), Desmond King (No. 151 overall), Sam Tevi (No. 190 overall), Isaac Rochell (No. 225 overall)

Reuter’s take:

Day 1 grade: A-
Day 2 grade: B
Day 3 grade: B+
Overall grade: B+
The skinny: Mike Williams is a physically dominating receiver who will make life easier for Philip Rivers. He has enough speed to make plays, as well. Keenan Allen‘s injury forced the team’s hand, as well. It will be interesting to see where second-round pick Forrest Lamp plays for the Chargers; he would be an excellent center. It was an excellent value pick. The Chargers again bolstered the interior of the line with Dan Feeney, who will play guard to protect Philip Rivers and block for Melvin Gordon. Hitting two interior linemen that early is a bit of a knock, as they need safety and linebacker help.

The Chargers‘ safety group needed an upgrade. Desmond King (fifth round) and Rayshawn Jenkins (sixth) should help in that effort. Finding an aggressive swing tackle in Sam Tevi in the sixth was a nice find, and adding versatile 3-4 lineman Isaac Rochell in the seventh was a solid pick.

 

My take on Tom Telesco:

 

BoogaTelesco

Sir, you complete me.

The fact that Telesco used three of his team’s seven selections on offensive linemen shows that the team is serious about opening up holes for their up-and-coming running back (Melvin Gordon) while also protecting their highest-paid asset (Philip Rivers).

Still, the question remains the same among the fans and media pundits alike: Has it become too late in the aging quarterback’s career for him to be a true difference maker?

I am a firm believer that the savvy veteran is more than capable of getting the job done for the Bolts for at least the next two years.

This team, knock on wood, will also be able to contend for the postseason should it muster up some ancient wizardry and stay relatively healthy for the first time in what seems like forever.

The Chargers have been one of the most injured teams in recent years, losing hundreds of starters all over the squad and playing 3,482 different offensive-line combinations in the last two years. (It feels as though I am only slightly exaggerating.)

 

The AFC West will once again enter the 2017 campaign as one of the top divisions in the league, and it shouldn’t surprise anyone if it turns out to be the best of them all. This division was already tough as nails prior to all four clubs having solid drafts this past weekend.

 

Thanks a lot for reading.

 

Booga Peters

 

 

 

LA Chargers

 

 

The individual who came up with the “#FightForLA” idea has to be the same moron who decided that ripping off the Los Angeles Dodgers logo and colors — and then adding a lightning-bolt tail to the end of it — was a solid marketing decision.

Are you shitting me?

Fight for LA?

The last time I checked, when Dean Spanos decided to move the Chargers from San Diego to Los Angeles, the newly relocated Rams were playing in the NFC of the National Football League.

In fact, just for shits and giggles, I just checked again and it appears that the Rams do play in the NFC.

There is nothing to fight over between the two teams who are slated to be stationed in the City of Angels; unless both repeat their performances from the last two seasons, posting records which would have them fight it out in the highly esteemed category of “Most Mediocre Team in Los Angeles.”

Though I expect the Chargers to win at least nine games during the ’17 regular season, too many of their superstars have spent more time on social media than the field the last two seasons, calling out former fans of the team because their loyalty remained with the city, as opposed to the organization owned by the Spanoses.

My note to those players will be the same one I have repeated to my two children since their births: “Don’t talk about it, be about it.”

I took a serious amount of time before I decided whether or not I would remain a Chargers fan, and my conclusion is that I have ALWAYS been a fan of the Chargers, despite only spending 14 years of my 38-plus in America’s finest city.

Please waste your time judging my decision, please (The two pleases were intentional).

I also decided that this website will be far more honest and less team-friendly regarding the Bolts, but we are going to re-brand, branching out to cover all 32 NFL teams, the NFL Draft and some college football.

The process of the aforementioned will take time, as I am going to do this primarily on my own with my money.

That being said, my money is on me — and hopefully the Los Angeles Chargers.

Throw me some hate in the comments, please! (I meant that ‘please,’ to be honest)

 

Booga Peters

 

 

 

Apr 28, 2016; Chicago, IL, USA; Fans of the San Diego Chargers react after the Joey Bosa (Ohio State) is selected as the third overall pick in the 2016 NFL Draft at Auditorium Theatre. Mandatory Credit: Chuck Anderson-USA TODAY Sports

Apr 28, 2016; Chicago, IL, USA; Fans of the San Diego Chargers react after the Joey Bosa (Ohio State) is selected as the third overall pick in the 2016 NFL Draft at Auditorium Theatre. Mandatory Credit: Chuck Anderson-USA TODAY Sports

 

Unlike every other article I write, I am not going to ramble incessantly in this one.

Here are some fan reactions regarding the Los Angeles Chargers’ newest addition in wide receiver Mike Williams.

 

Teofilo Nikolao Tuiteleleapaga III Initially, it caught me off guard. Reason being i felt we really needed pass rush help to compliment the emergence of Bosa. But, after letting it sink in..i understand the pick. And with more time passed, i actually like it. Could be a true #1 reciever that we’ve lacked in recent years. Big body and leaping ability makes up for his Speed imo. Hes not FAST, but fast enough. Immediate Red Zone threat. Complimented with the presence of Henry, Tyrell and company..he will be an immediate impact player

 

Gilbert Garcia I like Mike Williams! I think he has a great ability for separation and ability to go up and get balls.

 

Nick Millican Top 10 talent that fits a need

 

Terry Coe Jr I don’t understand LAC and their willingness to let Rivers get beat up. I have seen the slide Okung brought to Denver and I had hoped they would bring in some talent for competition. (Love this, btw)

 

Didier Dubrit I was a little bit afraid of Hooker because of injuries (as any Chargers fan know, if we can avoid injury prone players with all the injuries we already get, that’s a plus).
I was hoping either for DT/DE to complement Bosa and give us a crazy pass rush/run defense, or Williams, who gives a different kind of asset to the receiving corps that Chargers were missing since VJax left.
It would also have been nice if Adams had fallen to us, but that was unlikely.
Overall, I’m happy with the selection. This draft has more impactful defensive players, so I think it’s a good idea to go get the best offensive players when they are still there.

One fan agreed with the other so much, that he replied in this manner:

Brian Kates Dave, take everything Dubrit just said as my words as well……damn near word for word my thoughts. I am happy with Williams considering this draft.

 

Thomas Powell Defense wins championships. The chargers have holes on dline and in the secondary. By picking a WR they lost the cream of the crop players that are game changers. Another doofus move by the organization and of course applauded by their fanbase.

 

Daniel Locke NFL teams continue to draft players named Mike Williams without learning their lesson…those who are ignorant of the past are doomed to repeat it.

 

James Ebo When it comes to the NFL Draft the theory is that it’s supply and demand. The supply of defensive players meets the demand for the Chargers defensive needs. Because of that theory, they can afford to find additions to the defensive side of the ball and with the way the first round played out, there is valuable defensive talent in the early part of the second round. With that being said the selection of Mike Williams signals the future at Wide Receiver for the Chargers. Williams is a power receiver. He’s a red zone, outside the numbers, back shoulder fade, aggressive receiver that the Chargers have lacked since the days of Jackson and Floyd. He creates separation with power, he’s open when he’s not open and attacks the ball in the air better than any receiver in the draft and for that matter on the Chargers WR corps. This selection says that Anthony Lynn wants to implement a physical, power running game offense that’s dominant in the red zone. Grade A-

 

Eugenio Rodriguez Another big target one more year for Rivers….(V. Jackson, M.Floyd….) Amazing player, he can really catch the football to high level.

 

Ryan Brosnan VINCENT JACKSON AND RIVERS WILL MEET AGAIN… THATS HOW THIS PICK IS TO ME

 

Jeff Martin Big physical receiver that will fill the void that was left when Malcom Floyd retired

 

And then my brother, Will, drops the knowledge we all needed to read.

 

Will McCafferty I’m fine with the pick. Rivers has been making chicken salad out of chicken shit for years now. Allen is good, but rarely there, due to injury. Maybe putting a second receiver on the field that the defense must account for will take pressure, and some hits, off of Allen.
Personally, I would have gone defense but I like to think that an NFL GM and his teams talent evaluators know more than I do.

People are just having knee-jerk reactions after just one round. They don’t remember a year ago when they were angry with the Bosa pick.

 

I LOVE THE FANS!!!

Seriously.

 

Booga Peters

 

P.S. The dudes in the pic are my dudes. Y’all look great.

 

 

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