Corey Decker

Corey Decker

My name is Corey Decker. I stumbled on the Chargers a long time ago and have never looked back. I am born and raised in Arizona but visit San Diego often. I am also a writer at Halo Headquarters and RealSport .

hr

 

With the 13th overall pick in the 2017 NFL Draft, the Arizona Cardinals selected Temple linebacker Haason Reddick. Besides his passionate showing on the field, (recording 10.5 sacks and 22 tackles for loss in his last season of college), he also has a inspirational story that must be told.

In an interview with Jim Rome, Haason Reddick stated, “I didn’t know that you could go to college and walk on. I thought you needed a scholarship to be able to play on the team. So at first, I thought my football career was done.” Reddick said.

At Temple, Reddick walked on as a freshman with no scholarship, showing that he has determination and that is just the type of mentality the Arizona Cardinals are looking for. After he walked on, he not only earned a scholarship, but the respect of his coaches and teammates through skill, persistence, and determination.

“He’s everything right with college football.” His former coach at Temple Matt Rhule continued, “He’s tough, he’s hard-nosed. He got his degree and played so hard for us and so well for us and helped us turn this program around.” Rhule said.

One major perk besides his game-time mentality is the fact that he can play both outside and inside linebacker. His former coach at Temple spoke of this in an interview with Vince Marotta of Arizona Sports by saying, ““He’s a guy who can play off the ball and be a weak side inside linebacker and use that 4.5 speed to cover guys out of the backfield. At the same time, I think he can be a tremendous weapon blitzing. Not many running backs are going to be able to block this kid.” Rhule commented.

It looks like the Cardinals did okay with their first round pick this year, however, only time will tell. Arizona Cardinals General Manager Steve Keim said that he will not be red-shirting to start. Instead, he will play behind two Pro Bowl linebackers in Karlos Dansby and Deonne Buchannon. Reddick will be on the field in nickel formations. He will have great mentors in Dansby and Buchannon, giving the Arizona Cardinals a very bright defensive future.

Reddicks’ selection is a feel-good story as over 100,000 fans gathered at the steps of the famous Philadelphia Art Museum to watch the first round of the NFL Draft. Reddick went to Temple University in Philadelphia and a very loud cheer rose as his name was called as they witnessed the local boy make good.

Check out this video of his path to the NFL from childhood to first round pick below.

cover

Note: Before I begin I want to add that this is an opinion article, also known as an editorial

March 27, 2017:  the day that 31 NFL owners voted to uproot the Oakland Raiders, and allow the team to find a new home in Las Vegas. Sure, for the Raiders it may be a good option. They are moving to a territory that they would not have to share with anyone except an NHL team. One thing about the business of sports is that, yes, there is a massive business aspect to it; but it is not the same as any other industry.  The difference is the fans. Sure, in other industries there are consumers and customers, but that is still different than fan bases in sports.

Fans are practically owners of the teams. Most of the revenue comes from things that fans do such as buy merchandise, food, tickets, etc… Over the past two years there have been three teams that have left the cities that they have played in (some for 50-plus years) in order to go someplace with a bigger market. Now if this were a restaurant or store, it makes sense. More population equals more potential clients/customers. However these are not stores, these are teams with history. These are teams that integrate into the communities and make a personal and lasting impact on each and every fan. There is a reason that fan bases become family and it is that shared bond and experiences of being a fan of a team.

When teams move, they do not realize they are hurting both the image of the organization as well as their fans. Imagine a business that would abandon its largest stakeholder instead of trying to please said stakeholder. The company’s brand may go up in value, but what is the point of an increase of the brand if there is no loyalty to said brand?

Moving away from a large source of money based upon the “chance” that you could double the current revenue is one of the most greedy business decisions a team could make. The only thing that an increase in brand will help is the cost of selling said franchise.

The NFL, MLB, NHL, MLS, and NBA are a fan run industry. The reason that the sports industry is worth several hundred billion dollars, is mostly because of the amount of fans it draws. Being a fan is more than just liking this or liking that, being a fan is being a part of a community and supporting the team by spending money on gameday and on different things with the teams logo on it.

Why in the world ruin a good thing? Teams seem to think the way to earn more money is just to move to a bigger market. Maybe they are right in the short-term because since the Chargers moved they increased the value of the brand. However, they still have to play at a stadium that is meant for soccer with a low amount of seats. So even though the brand increased and the potential is there, the teams need to win a Super Bowl to make a “fan base” in Los Angeles. However, the owner doesn’t seem to care about championships.

In short, the NFL is going to feel the repercussions. It is hard to support teams that have a history of leaving. Maybe to begin with they will see an increase because of new markets in Los Angeles and Las Vegas. However, they will not see consistent revenue from the teams. With all of the rule changes and everything else, it is soon to be the NTFL (National Touch Football League) instead of the NFL, which would piss off a major target market in sports.

To the Indoor Football League we go!!! Go Rattlers.

LA

 

 

Yesterday was January 12, 2017, a day that shall live in infamy. Some will refer to it as the beginning of the end, and to others just the beginning.

 

The Chargers are officially moving to Los Angeles, and with this sudden and drastic change, many Charger fans are jumping ship to other teams, or dropping any passion they had for the NFL all together. Of course with those publicly made comments, there have been tons of rebuttals from fans of other NFL teams belittling said fans for doing so.

 

I say to those that are making the decision to follow another team: Although I am making the decision to follow them in Los Angeles under the condition that they remain the Chargers – I do not blame you.

 

I also come from a different background. I was not born and raised in San Diego. I became a Chargers fan at a very young age because everyone else around me where I lived, seemed to be an Arizona Cardinals fans. So in a way, I was a fan of the Chargers as an entity, not as a representation of a city.

 

Regardless of how I became a Charger fan, it still hurts me to watch the team leave by way of a press release; no public meeting,  just a cowardly gesture and they are gone like a thief in the night. I understand that the team is now not that far away from San Diego, however the team moved to what is considered to be a rival city.  I remember the benches clearing brawl in the Padres- Dodgers game a few years ago between Zack Greinke and Carlos Quentin! These two cities do NOT like each other. It is not to the likes of a New York and New Jersey rival; closer to that of a New York and Boston rivalry. Fans of the NFL born after 1996, who were not alive to witness the move of the Houston Oilers, St. Louis Cardinals and the original Cleveland Browns, do not understand the gravity of this situation.

 

The social media attacks of Charger fans walking away from the team, seem to forget that a majority of the fans they are chastising, the team was a large part of not only their community, but their upbringing as well. Without actually experiencing the situation yourself, you really have no idea what it is like to lose such a large part of your community – your life. Chargers fans in some of the Facebook groups compare it to having a girlfriend that cheats on you and then shares the picture with you on Facebook with her new ex. You still may love that girlfriend, but it is clear that she did not love you back.

 

That is the case with the Chargers in my opinion.  The reason for the low attendance the past few years is not just because of poor performance, but also the Spanos family yanking the citizens of San Diego around and giving them false hope.  It is not just the Spanos family, however, that is at fault.  I believe all sides regarding the team and the stadium issue are to blame.

 

Getting back to my original thought: Fans of the teams that either have not moved in their lifetime or have never moved, where their loyalty has never been tested, should not be telling Chargers fans about how loyal they are and blah, blah, blah. Those casting stones often forget that being a fan of any sports team is a passionate yet gentle distraction from the stressors of our daily lives. We put our heart and hopes into that team, and in return they give us hope and pride in something that is bigger than ourselves. A sports team is a large part of a community; it brings people together and in turn gives back to the community by public works. Now in San Diego, that entity is gone with no public meeting, just a few touches on a keyboard. That is why it hurts the way it does.

 

So for those who are not, or never were, Chargers fans, please be reminded that everyone is entitled to their opinions and feelings.  Your loyalty might not have been tested yet, and even if it has and you choose to stay with your team, I am fairly certain there were numerous fans of your team that jumped ship.

 

 

Thanks for Reading

 

Corey Decker

Qualcomm

 

 

The day of January 15, 2017 is almost here. That day is the date in which the Chargers need to either use the option to move the team to Los Angeles or to stay in San Diego, attempting to work out a mutually beneficial stadium agreement for the Chargers organization and the city of San Diego. Of course, there is also the option that they could ask to extend the option to Los Angeles, adding the much-needed time to keep the Bolts in America’s finest city. The move to Los Angeles would be a costly one, but it also would be a very, very, stupid decision on the part of Chargers management.

This season it was reported that most of the ticket sales for the Chargers-Raiders game in San Diego were from L.A. county, so much so that the Chargers had to practice the silent count in order to deal with the crowd. However, when the game was played, it was not a bunch of Chargers fans, it was a ton of Raiders fans.  That game should have been physical proof that the Chargers will not be welcome in Los Angeles.

“So they will re-brand and become more profitable.”

This is a false statement because Los Angeles already has two established fan bases: the Rams and the Raiders. Trying to build a completely new franchise would be next to impossible. Then the money that would be involved in such a re-brand.

Yikes.

First they would have to pay for a firm to conduct the survey about naming the team, then they would have to take the name to digital designers, after that they would have to create the merchandise. Keep in mind, that is not the merchandise that is sold to the general public. Think about the amount of logos you see of a team in any given stadium in any sport. The concourses have logos, the cups, the golf carts, the uniforms, the field of play, the jumbotrons and so on and so forth.

First, imagine the cost of all of that, then add the $500 million dollar relocation fee to the NFL. So, right now it is safe to say moving to Los Angeles will be a costly decision, I mean, it’s only a couple of billion dollars. All spent on the chance they might make a profit due to the larger audience. Personally, that seems like too much money to me to be spent on a “possibility”.  If they were to re-brand, as an original team in Los Angeles, history shows that all the teams who have already done that, have eventually moved away from Los Angeles.

With the history of the Spanos family that we have seen in San Diego, we know two things: they are not big spenders and they do not seem to make sound football decisions, they make business decisions. If someone wanted to move a business, why leave all the loyal customers, spend a couple of billion dollars, just purely on the possibility that you might actually turn a profit. In other words, there is a very small chance the Spanos’ clan will be successful in Los Angeles.

Recently the City and County of San Diego, along with San Diego State University, unveiled a new downtown stadium plan. Read about it in this link ( http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/sports/columnists/kevin-acee/sd-sp-charupdate-0103-story.html).

The headline reads that it would be up to the rest of the league to allow Spanos to move the team. I do not think that the owners are going to give up a ninth home game in San Diego. Not to mention, losing one of America’s largest tourist destinations would hurt the NFL’s bottom line in multiple ways.

After the Rams experiment in Los Angeles, the owners are probably very weary of the fans in Los Angeles. This seasons ratings for the Los Angeles Rams were actually LOWER than the tv ratings while the team was in St Louis. (Source: http://ftw.usatoday.com/2016/12/st-louis-los-angeles-rams-television-ratings-nfl)

That proves, in my mind, that even though they will be moving to a more populated area, that does guarantee that the team will make money. Even after all the money the Rams spent, they are (so far) not better off in Los Angeles.

In closing, the Chargers will not move to Los Angeles because of the necessary costs of the move and the results of the Los Angeles Rams’ experiment prematurely seeming to be a bad plan.

Not to mention, in the last game, there was a sign that was posted outside of the Q that said,” keeping the tradition in San Diego.” This means either they are staying, or they are keeping the name “Chargers” in San Diego.

 

Thanks a lot for reading.

 

Corey Decker

@CDecker96

 

BoltBlitzMeetup2

 

 

Before I begin, I want to say there are two groups of fans this does not apply to: the first is season ticket holders who did not sell their seats to opposing fans and went to all games; the second group is “Save Our Bolts.” It was very admirable what you guys did and you all should be very proud. It is also worth noting that the whole “Chargers to LA” thing is still mostly speculation at this point.

Obviously, there are more fans that this applies to, but I wanted to make sure to take the time to mention the folks who stand out in my mind. Again, thank you all for everything that you have done and that you’ll continue to do as we near a resolution regarding the stadium situation in San Diego.

Now, let’s get to the reason that the Chargers fan base is not without fault should the move occur.

First, the San Diego Chargers in 2016 are ranked 31st out of 32 in attendance. Behind them is the Oakland Raiders, so at least we are beating them in something this season. The sad fact is we are a lot better team than a lot of the teams above us, such as; Cleveland and Jacksonville. How is it that the fans of San Diego expect the team not to look at other options when they do not even show up to the game. Not to mention if anyone saw the games vs the Denver Broncos or Miami Dolphins this season, it looks like an away game for our squad. Here is an article USA Today created about this very phenomenon this season (http://broncoswire.usatoday.com/2016/10/13/san-diego-home-game-denver-broncos-chargers-tnf).

Second, fans of San Diego are letting the players down. Even more than they let us down on Sundays. Some may remember when the choice was announced that some Chargers players took to twitter and said, “every home game better be sold out.” Well, as previously stated, the Chargers are ranked 31st in attendance out of 32. So even though the players and organization are dying to get more fans to the stadium. To which the Chargers fan base plainly stated by their actions, no, we will not show up until you start winning games. In other words, a bandwagon mentality. (http://www.sbnation.com/lookit/2016/1/29/10873822/san-diego-chargers-players-reactions-los-angeles-show-up).

Third, the failure of Prop C, although the team did all they could, and so did the citizens initiative. The citizens of San Diego, do not want the Chargers, even though the plan actually included creating a permanent situation with comic con and zero taxpayer dollars. That was not enough to keep the team around.

It does not make sense for a team to stay someplace that they are not making money, that is what the bottom line is in the case of the Chargers. They are not making enough money off of tickets. Also with the low attendance numbers that does not help the other way that a lot of teams make money. They are called sponsors, how can you sell sponsorship or advertising space when you rank second to last in attendance and have not been higher than 19 in the past six years.

At least if they end up playing in the Stubhub Center in Carson, California as a temporary venue it is much smaller attendance wise and maybe just maybe, there is a chance for a 100 percent Chargers sellout game.

On the flip side, there is some things that the Chargers could have done marketing wise in order to get more and more CHARGER fans out to the game that have not been done. For example, maybe putting a winning football team on the field, or creating more advertisements and deals to specific groups that create a better image to the community of San Diego. Instead of just visiting places and doing community service, maybe invite those who do not have a lot to the game and grant them experiences that will last a lifetime. Usually if the public has a high opinion of a team, they are more likely to support that team. That is one reason why the Chicago Bears and every team in Chicago has some of the most loyal fans on earth.

The bottom line is, the San Diego Chargers have not ranked higher than 19th ever since 2009 when the Chargers went 13-3.

After proposition C got struck down with a vengeance by the voters from the city of San Diego, even though the stadium was going to be built using no taxpayer dollars what so ever. That leaves one logical spot, and that is to revamp the current mission valley location. It is a prime location because even though it is not close to downtown, it is surrounded by several major freeways and in a highly populated area. What is Dean Spanos thoughts on revamping the mission valley spot? In an interview with U-T San Diego, Dean said,” I am not a believer in Mission Valley — I don’t think I would ever go back there.” So, if he was being 100 percent truthful, that knocks out the Mission Valley option, leaving only Los Angeles on the table.

 

Corey Decker

chargers

 

 

In case you missed it, measure C, the plan that would have given the Chargers a brand new, non tax payer funded, downtown stadium got struck down with a vengeance by the citizens of San Diego. So what is next for the San Diego Chargers? Vegas? Los Angeles? Franchise disbandment?

 

If you ask me, someone who is currently studying sports business, the answer to that is none of the above.

 

The reason that it would not be Las Vegas, is because the Oakland Raiders have already been in talks with the city of Las Vegas and a move there is all but official. However, with the large amount of gambling that goes on in Las Vegas, something tells me Mr. Goodell is going to do anything in his power to not let that move happen. The Raiders fanbase or “Raider Nation”, is the perfect candidate for Las Vegas because of the large amount of residents that migrated from California. It is one team that is guaranteed to bring in a lot of money not just for the organization itself, but for the city of Las Vegas as well. So Vegas is out for the San Diego Chargers.

 

The issue with Los Angeles is that it is now Rams country after the team recently left St Louis. Before the Rams left for St Louis, they were the longest tenured team in Los Angeles, so as I stated before, they practically almost had an established fan base, minus of course the ones that became Raiders fans when the Raiders spent their time in LA. Citizens of Los Angeles do not want the Chargers; several fan polls done by ESPN and Fox Sports proved that earlier this year (2016). Not to mention there is a reason that the Chargers left the Los Angeles area in the very early stages of the franchise.

 

Now to franchise disbandment: This is a possibility so do not think that it is not. It is a highly unlikely possibility but it is still there. Let’s call it the worst case scenario. The reason this is a possibility is because San Diego is a bandwagon sports town – a transplant city. If you do not believe me, just look at the stands from this past Sunday, or look at how much measure C lost by. In places like San Francisco, you can not walk a city block without seeing at least seven 49ers logos. In San Diego, you are lucky to walk two miles to see one bolt on the window of a bar. They can not trust the fans in their own city to show up to games, and the answer to that is a whole other discussion/debate.

 

What I honestly believe will end up happening is the Chargers are going to have to look somewhere in San Diego county for a beachfront stadium. Why the beach you ask? It brings more people in and it encompasses what is so great about San Diego.

 

How great would a tailgate on the beach be?

 

The Chargers would be able to enclose an area specifically for that and charge per tailgater, similar to what the Arizona Cardinals do with the great lawn. There is a large amount of the population that likes to go to the beach, so not only would it give the Chargers a new stadium location, but you will see an increase in single game tickets, and more importantly, season ticket sales.  On top of all of that, it will make San Diego eligible to host the greatest money makers in all of sports; like the Super Bowl, the Final Four, and the college football championship.

 

Just my take, thank you for reading.

 

Corey Decker

gordon6

 

As Chargers fans are emotionally recovering from the team’s dramatic overtime victory over the Falcons in Week 7, let’s put Sunday’s big win in perspective. There are three different areas about Sunday’s game that shows us as fans that our team is not going to suck as bad as they did the first few games of the season.

  1. The comeback win itself – One thing that the Chargers could not do when they started this season was finish games. Even though the Bolts are in the top-5 of the entire NFL as far as points scored before halftime, they still are near the bottom, if not dead last, in the point-differential in the fourth quarter. Sunday’s game was different as the Chargers were down 27-10 in just the second quarter. It seemed a very daunting task to complete that sort of comeback with this team, They used to be the only team in the national football league that could have a three- or four-touchdown lead, and their fans would still be on edge like it was a one or two touchdown lead. Phillip Rivers and the San Diego Chargers showed great resilience, creating a daring comeback that would eventually end in an overtime victory.
  2. Defense – The defense was the unspoken heroes of this game, particularly Joey Bosa and Denzel Perryman. One thing that is overlooked about this game was that the Atlanta Falcons did not just defeat both the Oakland Raiders and the Denver Broncos. They also are the number one scoring offense in the national football league, even earning the praise of San Diego Chargers defensive coordinator John  Pagano. Who stated , “I looked in the dictionary at the word explosive, and when I pulled it up, a picture of the Falcons showed up.” This is very large praise for one team to give to another. So what ended up happening? In the first half, Atlanta scored 27 points, one passing touchdown, one rushing touchdown, and three field goals. They also scored on a fumble recovery. However the narrative changed in the second half, as the Falcons, this super high-powered offense, only managed to score 3 points in the ENTIRE second half PLUS overtime. This is a very large feat, especially against a team like Atlanta who has not scored less than 21 in any game this season, almost racking up 50 points versus the NFC champion Carolina Panthers.
  3. Special Teams, Although there was the mix-up on the kickoff in which Griff Whalen misread the ball and came out of the end zone instead of just letting the ball roll in and giving better field position to the offense. The special teams in this game actually did really well. After all, it was special teams that won us the game in overtime. It looks like having Kellen Clemens hold the ball on the field goal attempts made a world of difference in our special teams play. Also it doesn’t hurt that the punter Drew Kaser was actually able to kick the ball further than a little girl serving in her little league soccer match. The only times the Falcons started their possession on the Chargers side of the field were because of turnovers and not because of a bad punt or a bad kick, which is a huge bright side.

It seems like there are a lot of things that worked out this past Sunday, not to mention the awesome day that Melvin Gordon had two rushing touchdowns, and a receiving touchdown while averaging 8 yards after the catch. He also made a heads up running play that kept the Chargers hopes alive. It’s beginning to look like the San Diego Chargers are starting to gel, however only time will tell. From what I saw on Monday, I can see the Chargers making the wildcard, if they keep that resilience, and nothing goes too haywire, this team should be in good shape.

 

Corey Decker

@CDecker96

voteyesonc1

 

As many have seen through all sorts of mediums, the time is finally here; it is time to vote on the building of the new Chargers stadium in downtown San Diego. It almost seems like people forget the impact that PETCO Park had on the San Diego landscape, transforming the area it was built in from a lonely ghetto to one of San Diego’s most valued real estate areas.

During last year, when the NFL was having its meetings about the Chargers, Raiders and Rams and where they would all end up, there were all sorts of fan polls taken as to who they would prefer in the Los Angeles area to represent the NFL.

The team at the very bottom of every poll presented was none other than the Chargers. Although polls can be misleading because of the sample size of each, driving through the Los Angeles and Orange County cities, one can see who really runs the city of angels, meaning the Rams and the Raiders.

Dean Spanos has ruled out rebuilding on the current site of Qualcomm Stadium, guaranteeing to everyone that the Chargers organization is putting all of their eggs in one basket, going full force for the downtown stadium. Of course, it would be wonderful if it does pass and does get built. However, what happens if it doesn’t pass? After all, this is the city who allows the away team to overrun its own stadium. The amount of Chargers fans in Los Angeles is extremely dismal, and one would think that after lasting only one season in Los Angeles that history would repeat itself.

The Chargers are going against well established LA teams, and hoping to pull a fan base out of thin air. It makes it worse that one of those established fan bases in Los Angeles is already a hated rival of the Chargers.

My question is, how do you expect to build a sports franchise when MOST of your future stakeholders have grown up hating your brand? It’s like R/C Cola creating a factory and headquarters right next to Coca-Cola in Atlanta, GA. Just bad business.

There is no future for the Chargers in Los Angeles.

So, the bottom line is, vote yes on C, or else in 2-3 years, we will have no team to root for. No let’s go Chargers; everything we own will become franchise wear similar to those who own Houston Oilers’ merchandise. The Chargers are a staple of San Diego, and to let them leave would be a catastrophic disaster.

 

Corey Decker

@CDecker96

RiversGates2

 

Will the 2016 campaign be the last year that we see both Philip Rivers and Antonio Gates on the field together? What will happen to the Chargers’ dynamic duo? Will they continue to be great after this season? Or will we have to say goodbye to our future hall of fame tight end, Antonio Gates, at year’s end?

There are two different ways to answer this question: the first is contractually and the second is by observation.

First, we will cover contractually. According to Antonio Gates’ contract, he is still going to be with the Chargers through 2017 when he becomes an unrestricted free agent. So, he technically has two years to make the decision whether to retire early, or to play out the reminder of his contract and mentor the Chargers tight end of the future, Hunter Henry.

Personally, I watched Henry when he played for the University of Arkansas just this past year, and I was astonished at what I saw. He had a role that was similar to the one that Antonio Gates has for the Chargers; meaning that he was his quarterback’s first choice to throw the ball to, rather than a check-down, which seems to be what most tight ends are that are not named Gates, Gronkowski or Graham.

Now, let’s look at the observation. Looking at Gates’ statistics from the 2015 season, also known as the season the Chargers donated more than half their roster to the DL and IR (but that is another story), he only appeared in 11 of 16 games last season. Last season he only had 56 receptions and 630 receiving yards, as compared to the season before when he had 69 receptions and 821 yards.

It would not be a bad thing for Antonio Gates to retire after this season, and according to UT San Diego, he is contemplating it very seriously. Personally, I see this as what SHOULD be a driving force to the Chargers this season, similar to the Ravens several years ago when it seemed to be all about #WinItForRay. Ray, of course, is in reference to their long-time defensive captain and emotional center of the team, Ray Lewis.

Of course, only time will tell when Antonio Gates retires, but one thing is for certain: whenever he does retire, he should get into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on the first ballot.

 

Corey Decker

@Cdecker96

 

Bosa8

 

Finally! The deal is done and the Chargers have signed their first-round draft pick. But is that enough news after the large media circus that surrounded this issue, turning fans against Joey Bosa? For some fans, a name signed on a contract is not going to be enough to ease their frustration over the whole situation. Bosa will have to prove himself, not just on the field, but off it, as well; to show that he is worth more than just the money received when he signed on the dotted line, but also the love of the fanbase.

So what he should do?

  1. Get involved in the community: They say any press is good press, but the best press is usually where outsiders can see the character of the individual. If Joey gets involved in the community, it will show the citizens of San Diego that he is not just the spoiled brat that the media portrayed him to be. There are many ways to get involved in the community, such as picking up trash on the beach, signing autographs with sick children or participating in food drives.
  2. Prove it on the field: After holding out for as long as he did and missing almost the entire preseason, the Chargers organization needs to see if this is truly a good investment. As we all saw from Johnny Manziel, how well they did in college does not always transfer to the NFL. No one is expecting him to come right out of the gate and be the next Ray Lewis or JJ Watt, but as long as he can show promise and determination, he should be fine.
  3. Earn respect from his teammates: As many saw from the Denver Broncos last season, defensive chemistry is a must if you expect to make the playoffs or have a winning record. He must show his teammates that he is the missing piece to this defense.

The point is the media, as usual, blew all of this way out of proportion, even to the point of predicting trades. It is going to be an uphill battle for Bosa; not just getting his body “football ready,” per his words, but also winning over his teammates and the fan base at large.

Though this may seem to be a bit of an uphill battle for the former Buckeye, there are plenty of reasons why this young man was taken with the third overall pick in this year’s draft. Starting with his first snap of live play, Bosa will remain under the microscope until he takes care of the aforementioned items above.

Again, get involved in the community, make plays on the field, thus, earning the respect of his teammates, and we’ll all soon forget the tumultuous offseason surrounding one of the highest draft picks the organization has selected in many years.

Quite frankly, we at BoltBlitz.com expect him to take care of business, showing everyone that he not only belongs on this team, he will earn the right to be called a solid pick and huge contributor for many years to come.

 

Corey Decker

Shop for Authentic Autographed Chargers Collectibles at SportsMemorabilia.com
Subscribe

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Shop for Authentic Autographed Chargers Collectibles at SportsMemorabilia.com


Copyright © 2013. All Rights Reserved.